Fears of new COVID-19 cluster at North Sumatra University as rector tests positive

first_imgThe rector of the North Sumatra University (USU) in Medan, Runtung Sitepu, along with deputy rector Rosmayati and the university’s board of trustees member Darma Bakti have tested positive for COVID-19, local authorities confirmed on Sunday. “There are three USU executives who tested positive for COVID-19. To contain the spread of the virus, we urge all those who have been in close contact with them within the last 14 days to take a swab test at the USU hospital or other swab test centers located in North Sumatra,” USU hospital director Syah Mirsya Wali said on Sunday.The three confirmed cases in USU have raised concerns of a new COVID-19 cluster in the region as the campus remains open, with computer-based exams (UTBK) as part of the annual state university entrance test (SBMPTN) set to continue until the end of the month with as many as 35,794 participants. USU spokesperson Elvi Sumanti said the matter was “still being coordinated with the executive board,” adding that all campus activities would continue normally.“The rector tested positive, without showing any symptoms, based on the independent swab test that he took,” she told The Jakarta Post. Runtung himself confirmed his health status to the press via phone on Sunday. “I am fine and I don’t feel like I am sick,” he said.He also urged anyone who had been in close contact with him to take a COVID-19 swab test immediately. “I don’t want to cover it [positive COVID-19 result] up, that is why I am asking this matter to be published.”Meanwhile, North Sumatra COVID-19 task force spokesperson Aris Yudhariansyah called on USU to do comprehensive tracing and implement strict health protocols to curb the spread of the virus in one of the biggest and most prestigious universities in the region. According to the official government count, North Sumatra has 2,323 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with 123 deaths as of Sunday.(trn)Topics :last_img read more

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50 Kg of Cocaine Seized Aboard Ship in Colombia

first_imgColombian Navy and Police have seized 50 kilograms of cocaine hydrochloride transported on board a Panama-flagged general cargo ship which was en route to the Port of Colon, Panama.The operation, conducted by the Coast Guard of Puerto Bolivar in coordination with the anti-narcotics division of police, was carried out at the Puerto Nuevo pier, La Guajira, on May 26.A group of divers from the diving and salvage department of the navy undertook an underwater inspection of the 495 gross ton vessel named Carmen I, finding a cylinder loaded with cocaine.The drugs, found in 50 packages, were seized and brought to the Riohacha Police Sation for inspection.As disclosed, the cocaine, which has a street value of around USD 2 million, may belong to an organized armed group Los Pachenca.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Field hockey alumni rely on former teammates in transition

first_imgThe Daily Orange is a nonprofit newsroom that receives no funding from Syracuse University. Consider donating today to support our mission.Emma Russell wanted to see the West Coast again before leaving the United States and Syracuse. So, in late May 2016, Russell and field hockey teammate Alma Fenne headed to California where they went whale watching in Monterey, visited Yosemite National Park and stayed with Russell’s uncle for 10 days.Eventually, the two went north to Oregon to watch some friends on the Syracuse track and field team compete in the national championships. After that, the pair headed back to Syracuse one last time before Russell departed for New York City, where she boarded a flight to Ireland. This time, she only needed a one-way ticket. After calling Syracuse home for four years, Russell said it was difficult to leave. It’s more than leaving field hockey behind, 2018 alum Lies Lagerweij said. For players leaving Syracuse and their teammates and coaches, the post-graduation adjustment is difficult, Lagerweij said. Moments and rituals — like horoscope Mondays, a weekly team event at Recess Coffee where players read each other’s horoscopes — were the hardest to let go, she said. “The simple things like getting changed in the locker room and listening to music together and hanging out before games, going to Bruegger’s for breakfast, just little rituals like that,” Lagerweij said. “I miss those a lot.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLagerweij still sees former teammates Roos Weers and Borg van der Velde from time to time, since all three live in the Netherlands. And Russell visits from Ireland in her spare time. Like any alumna, Weers misses her friends from SU, but it’s Syracuse’s field hockey program that she misses most.That includes Corey Parker, the strength and conditioning coach who was key throughout Weers’ collegiate career, the woman who cleaned the locker room before the team’s 7 a.m. practices, and the lady who sat at the front desk of Stevenson Educational Center where athletes met with academic tutors.Since graduating, Russell has had to cope with a loss of team spirit and community. In addition to four hours a day on the field with her teammates, they also ate together every night.Teammates used to wander across South Campus and into Russell and Lagerweij’s apartment, which served as a meeting hub because of its proximity to Manley Field House, Russell said. Now, Russell relies on video calls to stay in touch with her teammates.“It really did take me nearly a year to kind of settle back in and kind of adjust to a new lifestyle a little bit,” Russell said.While Russell trained with the team once a week during the spring before she graduated, she talked with Lauren Brooks, an SU alum assisting the team during the fall 2015 season, about the upcoming transition. Brooks was helpful because she understood the difficulties, Russell said. Two years later, when Lagerweij wrapped up her college career, she turned to Russell with the same questions about life after graduation.Because of the team’s lack of a hierarchy, Lagerweij said that once younger players became the leaders of the team, they felt comfortable turning to former teammates for post-graduation advice.“Graduation is a very mixed feeling, because yes, you’re excited about what’s to come,” Lagerweij said. “But still it’s just really hard to leave a place where you’ve been for so long, that’s been your home for so long.”For Lagerweij, she’ll always remember the time she returned to her dorm after visiting the hospital with a knee injury. Once she opened her door, she saw all her freshman teammates with a cookie cake and a card. While on a recruiting visit to Syracuse, she didn’t believe that her team would become like family — but after her freshman season, she changed her mind. Leaving a team of people who she spent countless hours around was challenging for everyone, but Russell understood the importance of transitioning away. It takes time, Russell said, but eventually she was ready.“When everyone’s kind of moving on, it’s easier for you to, to kind of get a move on as well,” Russell said. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Published on August 26, 2020 at 10:34 pm Contact Thomas: tgshults@syr.edu | @ThomasShults5last_img read more

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