Khloe Kardashian, Tristan Thomson Dress as Cleopatra, Mark Antony: Pics

first_imgQueen and king of Halloween! Khloé Kardashian and Tristan Thompson channeled their inner royals as Cleopatra and Mark Antony.“👑❤️Halloween 2020 ❤️👑 Mommy and Tutu make me look good in these pics 😁,” Thompson, 29, wrote via Instagram on Monday, November 2.- Advertisement – The family’s Halloween celebration came days after the Revenge Body host and the athlete took their little one to the Nights of Jack Halloween experience on Tuesday, October 27.Earlier in the month, the couple jetted off to a private island as part of Kim Kardashian’s 40th birthday party crew. They were also spotted getting flirty at Kim’s surprise birthday bash, which was featured on the October 21 episode of KUWTK.Us exclusively confirmed in August that the Strong Looks Better Naked author and Thompson rekindled their romance after breaking up in February 2019 following Thompson’s cheating scandal.Since getting back together, the pair have spent a lot of time together and with their daughter.“They have been acting like a married couple and are so comfortable with each other,” a source exclusively told Us in September. “Tristan has been being a great dad. Things are really coming around and Khloé is hopeful about their future.”Last month, a second source told Us that “Tristan and Khloé are doing really good,” adding that “Tristan has been really good to her recently.”Scroll down to see the trio’s golden Halloween costumes. The Cleveland Cavaliers player shared a series of photos of himself dressed as the Roman general alongside his girlfriend, 36, and their 2-year-old-daughter, True.The Good American cofounder embodied Mark Antony’s lover, Egyptian ruler Cleopatra, while True matched her parents as a royal toddler.“♔ Cleopatra ♔♔ Mark Antony ♔♔ Royal Highness True ♔,” Kardashian captioned her own group of photos from the holiday, noting all of their gilded outfits were custom-made by Bryan Hearns.- Advertisement – The Keeping Up With the Kardashians star’s ensemble included a gold bra top, high-waisted skirt, gold cape, heels and gem-filled headdress. She topped off her look with the ruler’s iconic black hairstyle.The NBA player’s costume matched Kardashian’s and had a chest plate, metal skirt, crown and warrior helmet.True posed alongside her parents in a gold dress that featured angel-wing sleeves.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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The Arsenal team Unai Emery should pick for the Europa League this season

first_imgAdvertisement Comment Arsenal’s Europa League fixtures Eintracht Frankfurt (a) Thursday 19 SeptemberStandard Liege (h) Thursday 3 OctoberVitoria SC (h) Thursday 24 OctoberVitoria SC (a) Wednesday 6 NovemberEintracht Frankfurt (h) Thursday 28 NovemberStandard Liege (a) Thursday 12 December Both Rob Holding and Hector Bellerin are on the comeback trail for Arsenal (Picture: Getty)Central defence is an immediate concern following Sunday’s shambles at Vicarage Road. Neither Sokratis nor Luiz have particularly exuded confidence so far, the former committing a basic error leading to a goal against Watford and Luiz giving two penalties away already.AdvertisementAdvertisementNews that Rob Holding is fit again and in contention to play against Eintracht Frankfurt, therefore, is very welcome indeed. Holding managed to forge a place in Emery’s Premier League plans off the back of his performances in Europe last season and will be hoping to repeat the trick again.Otherwise, the likes of Calum Chambers and Shkodran Mustafi will be hoping to catch the eye, with the former having played a part in a rare clean sheet against Newcastle United on the opening day.Deputy goalkeeper Emi Martinez will likely start in goal having been persuaded to stick around.MidfieldEmery has stuck rigidly to a four-man defence in Arsenal’s opening games but he has been more flexible with his midfield and attacking units. Already, Emery has experimented with four different systems – 4-2-3-1 (twice), 4-3-3, 4-3-1-2 and a similar 4-4-2 diamond.Of Emery’s midfield options, only Matteo Guendouzi has started all five games, with Dani Ceballos, Joe Willock, Granit Xhaka, Lucas Torreira and Mesut Ozil, all drifting in and out of the side. Of those six players, Willock and the curiously under-used Torreira, appear the most likely players to feature prominently in Europe.Depending on how Emery decides to shape his attack once Alexandre Lacazette is fit enough to link up with Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang and Nicolas Pepe, Ozil too could see most of his action coming in the Europa League. Playing all four in the Premier League would certainly be a brazen approach and Arsenal’s top-earner is the least nailed-on for his place. Advertisement Unai Emery will be looking to juggle competitions again this season (Picture: Getty)Unai Emery’s reputation as a Europa League specialist took a hit last season after he lost the first of his four final appearances in the competition.Throughout his debut campaign at Arsenal, Emery sought to juggle expectations in the Premier League and Europa League by simultaneously trying to construct a side capable of finishing in the top-four of the former and winning the latter.Ultimately, Arsenal fell just short of achieving either of those objectives, missing out on Champions League qualification by a single point in the league and courtesy of a heavy 4-1 defeat to Chelsea in an underwhelming evening in Baku.AdvertisementAdvertisementConsidering those near misses, perhaps Emery will be more inclined to focus on one more than the other this time around. According to The Athletic, Emery largely neglected advice from his staff to rotate his squad heavily for Europa League matches.ADVERTISEMENT Oliver Young-MylesThursday 19 Sep 2019 7:00 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link349Sharescenter_img How Arsenal could line-up in the Europa League this seasonMore: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Nicolas Pepe is yet to score a goal for Arsenal since his £72m move from Lille (Picture: Getty)Given Aubameyang’s importance and the fact he turned 30 in June, Emery could be tempted to manage his minutes more carefully this season. There is no question that Aubameyang is Arsenal’s most important player, at present.Once Lacazette has resumed fitness, it makes sense to rotate the pair in Europe, but until then perhaps Pepe can be trialled in a central striker role. The Ivorian partnered Aubameyang at Anfield but is more accustomed to playing from the right flank.AdvertisementA return of 22 goals for Lille last season shows that Pepe, despite a barren start to his Arsenal career, can be a clinical finisher and perhaps that short-term move could get him firing. Youngsters Gabriel Martinelli and Tyreece John-Jules could also be in the frame.How Arsenal could line-up The Arsenal team Unai Emery should pick for the Europa League this season Reiss Nelson should feature prominently in Arsenal’s Europa League campaign (Picture: Getty)With Lacazette and Aubameyang representing Emery’s only established centre forward options, it seems likely he will use a system utilising wingers in order to give one of them a rest, such as a 4-3-3 or a 4-2-3-1. Doing so should give opportunities to Reiss Nelson and Emile Smith Rowe.AdvertisementNelson started Arsenal’s first two games of the campaign before Pepe was unleashed against Liverpool and he may find that the majority of his starts from now on will come in Europe. Smith Rowe is similarly highly-rated but has had a difficult time with injuries of late, while Bukaya Sako is another with a big future.Perhaps, once Bellerin is fit or if Emery fancies trialling either Chambers or Mustafi at right-back, Maitland-Niles could get an opportunity to demonstrate his qualities in his natural box-to-box midfield role, as opposed to his now customary position in defence.AttackThere must be some regret at Arsenal over the decision to allow Nketiah to leave on loan, considering the 20-year-old has been in electric form in the Championship, netting four goals in six appearances for Leeds United.Nketiah’s absence has been exacerbated by Lacazette’s ankle injury which will rule him out until October. Currently, Aubameyang is the only fit and available striker in Emery’s ranks and considering the form he is in, keeping him fit is absolutely imperative.Somewhat surprisingly given his status as Arsenal’s main man up front, Aubameyang played 284 minutes more than Lacazette in last season’s Europa League, despite also amassing over 2,000 extra minutes in the Premier League. An issue that Emery has, though, is that a number of his fringe players last season have since moved on. Emery added five players to his first-team squad over the summer, but 13 players departed, including Europa League stalwarts Mohamed Elneny, Alex Iwobi and Nacho Monreal.Emery’s decision to allow highly-rated striker Eddie Nketiah join Leeds United on loan for the season has also been questioned, with Cohen Brammall – released this summer – saying: ‘I feel sorry for Ed because Danny [Welbeck] was injured for a lot of the season and Ed should have been given more chances.’Sunday’s disappointing draw against Watford showed that Arsenal have plenty of work to do if they are to achieve their top-four ambitions this season and with rivals Chelsea, Manchester United and Spurs, all undergoing varying degrees of regeneration, the league is Emery’s primary objective.That will mean the Europa League taking the back seat, but with a reduced squad and injury problems to contend with, what should Emery’s Europa League side team actually look like?DefenceEmery’s defence has had a familiar look to it so far this season with Bernd Leno, Ainsley Maitland-Niles and Sokratis Papastathopolous starting all five Premier League games, David Luiz starting four of them and Sead Kolasinac assuming the left-back role since Monreal’s departure.There hasn’t been much of an opportunity to rotate the full-backs due to injuries to Hector Bellerin and Kieran Tierney, but with both players now in full training, Emery will soon be able to alternate between Premier League and Europa League games.Bellerin and Tierney are the best full-backs in Arsenal’s squad but they will both need consistent minutes to get up to speed. It may transpire that Emery initially uses them in the more serene settings of the Europa League, before eventually switching them with Maitland-Niles and Kolasinac in the league.last_img read more

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Book review: ‘Smokin’ Joe: The Life of Joe Frazier’

first_imgNear the end of “Smokin’ Joe,” hedging on this acknowledgment, Kram writes, “People who knew him for years told me they were sure that Frazier carried his animus for Ali to the grave, that he had been wounded so deeply that he could never let it go. But others were certain that he had come to peace with Ali, particularly those who knew him from his boyhood days in South Carolina. Nearly all told me some variation of ‘Billy never hated a soul in his life.'”But those who knew Frazier “from his boyhood days in South Carolina” were wrong. It’s beyond question that, at times in his life, Frazier did hate Ali. Thus, Kram would have done better to end “Smokin’ Joe” with his own eloquently worded observation: “Any conclusion either way is perhaps clouded by your own thoughts of how forgiving you would be in the same circumstances. Perhaps some of it also has to do with your own belief in the power of reconciliation, how you define ‘unforgivable,’ and the enchantment of happy endings.”Thomas Hauser’s email address is thomashauserwriter@gmail.com. His most recent book – Protect Yourself at All Times  – was published by the University of Arkansas Press. In 2004, the Boxing Writers Association of America honored Hauser with the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism. Hundreds of books have been written about Muhammad Ali. As Ali biographer Wilfrid Sheed noted, “He’s one of those madonnas you want to paint at least once in your life.” But surprisingly few books — and fewer good ones — have been written about the men who, with Ali, defined “the golden age of heavyweight boxing.” Joe Frazier, George Foreman and Larry Holmes lent their names to autobiographies. But none of these efforts did justice to their subject.”Smokin’ Joe: The Life of Joe Frazier” by Mark Kram Jr. (published by HarperCollins) does justice to its subject. Frazier won a gold medal at the 1964 Olympics and engaged in memorable heavyweight championship fights against Jimmy Ellis and George Foreman. But he’s best remembered for three fights against Muhammad Ali, historic encounters that are the pyramids of boxing.MORE: Join DAZN and watch classic fights plus more than 100 fight nights a yearAt his best, Frazier fought with unrelenting savage fury. “His way was the hard way,” Kram writes. “In the ring, he lived and died by the simple yet daring principle of engagement that, in order to deliver one bone-crunching blow, it was frequently necessary to absorb three in exchange. No one would ever have cause to question his heart or his courage under fire.”After fighting Frazier, George Chuvalo declared, “He fights six minutes of every round.”Frazier was born in Beaufort County in South Carolina on Jan. 12, 1944. His parents, Rubin and Dolly Frazier, had 11 children (eight boys and three girls).A lot has been written about growing up in the midst of ignorance, poverty and disease in the poorest parts of rural America. Kram’s treatment of the subject is well-researched and evocatively written. He writes about Frazier’s early years in a way that brings “Billy Boy” (as Frazier was known then) and his surroundings to life.It was a world where, in Kram’s words, “Fifty percent of African American males [in Beaufort County] suffered from syphilis which rendered them ineligible for service in World War II. Whatever contrived harmony existed between the races hinged on the adherence by blacks to a wide range of humiliating inequities.”Frazier dropped out of school at an early age. His rural South Carolina vernacular left many with the false impression that he was “slow of mind” — an image that Ali later cruelly propagated. He took a bus north to New York where he stole cars and sold them to a junkyard no-questions-asked to make ends meet. Then he moved to Philadelphia, found work in a slaughterhouse, and took up boxing under the watchful eye of Yank Durham.Frazier was short for a heavyweight and had a limited reach. But as Kram notes, “Beyond the raw power he spotted in Frazier, Durham ascertained that there was a big engine inside him. To counterbalance Joe’s physical shortcomings, he was of the belief that Frazier only had one way to go and that was straight ahead into the chest of his opponent.”That was how Frazier fought.Kram explores the Philadelphia gym culture and the ring wars that came with it. He chronicles Frazier’s pro career from his first fight through the sad coda at the end of his fighting days, an undeserved draw against Floyd “Jumbo” Cummings. He details how, for much of his career, Frazier fought with eye damage that severely limited his vision (“I’d rather be rich and blind than poor and blind,” he said).Frazier, of course, will be remembered forever in tandem with Ali and measured forever against him.Muhammad Ali, who proclaimed, “I outshine the sun.””The rivalry between Frazier and Ali,” Kram writes, “was a cultural happening that exposed the deep fissures in American society. By an accident of circumstances, they ended up in the crosshairs of an argument far larger than themselves.”In this rivalry, Kram notes, Frazier “came face to face with black-on-black hate language in his exchanges with Ali. Whatever heights of athletic achievement they drove each other to inside the ring, they dragged each other down in a running feud outside of it.”Kram deftly chronicles the burgeoning war of words between Frazier and Ali; a war that verged on violence between the two men on several occasions during Ali’s exile from boxing. As the book evolves, all three Ali-Frazier fights are well told.In the dressing room before Ali-Frazier I, Durham told Frazier, “Win tonight and the road will be paved in gold.”Frazier won. But even then, his dreams weren’t fully realized. Ali had turned a substantial portion of the black community against him. The now-undisputed heavyweight champion of the world wasn’t able to fully enjoy his reign. He never received the respect he should have as a fighter or a man.”Smokin’ Joe” covers a wide range of subjects from the formation of Cloverlay (the Philadelphia syndicate that financially backed Frazier) to Frazier’s unfortunate relationship with Frank Rizzo (the Philadelphia cop who was elected mayor on a platform of not-so-subtle racism aimed at the black community).It’s infused with anecdotal material such as Frazier’s effort to launch a singing career (his most notable moment as a singer came in 1970 when he slipped onstage while performing and broke his ankle).One theme explored in depth is Frazier’s profligate womanizing.Frazier had four children by two different women (Florence Smith and Rosetta Green) before his 19th birthday. He and Florence married on June 25, 1963, while she was pregnant with their third child. They were so poor that Frazier borrowed his sister Mazie’s wedding ring to use in the ceremony.Kram describes Frazier as being “restless at home.” That’s an understatement. Over the years, he fathered 11 children (six sons and five daughters) by six different women. Florence was the mother of five of the children. In addition to Green, four other women — Joan Mahoney, Sharon Hatch, Janice Cotton and Sheri Gibson — carried a child of Frazier’s to term.”Frazier let the good times roll when it came to women,” Kram writes. “He was prolific in his sexual adventures. Although he loved his children and took seriously his obligation to see to their welfare, he felt hemmed in by the sameness of domestic life. Occasionally, as the four walls began closing in on him, he would engage in quarrels at home late at night as a pretext to storm out of the house in search of action. He looked upon his dalliances as a prerogative due him once the [household] bills were paid.”Some of Frazier’s children were raised in comfort. Others grew up in inner-city public housing. But he loved all of them. At one point, he took his 1964 Olympic gold medal to a jeweler with instructions to carve it into charms, one for each child.In 1985, Joe and Florence began litigating a divorce. The proceeding (like a Dickensian tale out of “Bleak House”) took 12 years to resolve.Kram also gives a detailed account of Frazier’s long (1968 through 2011) relationship with Denise Menz, the most consistent of his extra-marital lovers. Over the years, Menz became, in Kram’s words, Frazier’s “confidante, lover, business partner, and, occasionally, indentured servant. Wherever Joe appeared, it seemed that she was never far away. Charged by Frazier with running his office, she kept the books, lined up caterers, helped him choose his wardrobe, decorated the gym and the upstairs living quarters, and even did loads of laundry.”Menz (who was one of Kram’s sources in writing “Smokin’ Joe”) said of her lover, “He would kneel at his bedside and say his prayers the way a small child would. He believed in all of the Ten Commandments except the ones dealing with adultery. He told me, ‘The Lord don’t care about that.'”Menz also acknowledged what Kram calls “episodes of turbulence” between Frazier and herself with the emergence of other women in Frazier’s later years. “It was the only thing we ever fought about,” Menz said. “I knew I was the other woman but not that there were other women.”Frazier and Menz (who is white) also had to deal with the societal pressures of being in an interracial relationship.”Given how society frowned upon interracial affairs in the 1960s,” Kram states, “it would not have gone well for Joe if it became common knowledge that he was engaged in one. Beyond the certain havoc that it would have caused at home, it surely would have hurt his efforts to build a commercial brand.”The decades after Frazier retired as an active fighter are also well-told in “Smokin’ Joe.” He had always been a drinker. But he drank a lot more than he had before after his days in the ring came to an end.Eventually, Frazier tried his hand at training fighters. In the late-1970s and 1980s, he worked with his oldest child, Marvis, who’d been born in 1960 when Joe and Florence were 16. Marvis was taller and a much lighter puncher than his famous father. He also had a not-particularly-good chin. Referencing Joe’s deficiencies as a trainer, Kram observes, “When it came to passing down his know-how, he only knew the way he had done it. He was not adaptable to fighters’ individual skill sets. When he worked with young fighters, it was as if he saw within them the potential to re-create himself.”Commenting on Frazier’s my-way-or-the-highway approach to training, Eddie Futch declared, “You’ll never be able to convince Joe that he was wrong. Anyone who disagrees with him on anything becomes the enemy.”Marvis won 19 fights as a pro but suffered brutal knockout defeats when overmatched against Larry Holmes and Mike Tyson.One of Frazier’s children is now an attorney. Another died in prison. Nine of Joe’s 11 children are alive today. Kram interviewed four of them. Joseph Jordan Frazier (born to Sharon Hatch in the early 1980s) shared the thought, “My father loved the only way he knew how.”Late in life, his money gone, Frazier suffered from diabetes and hypertension. He underwent surgery for neck, back and shoulder problems. While mowing the lawn, he accidentally cut off one of his toes. Worse, he developed cognitive issues of his own, presumably from the many blows to the head he took in boxing. The final blow was liver cancer. He died on Nov. 7, 2011.There are some nagging factual errors in “Smokin’ Joe.” For example, Kram writes that Ali was allowed to fight Oscar Bonavena at Madison Square Garden (with Ali-Frazier I on the horizon) because “New York had relented and given him a license on the heels of his comeback in Atlanta.” But New York didn’t “relent.” A federal judge ruled that the New York State Athletic Commission had violated Ali’s constitutional rights and ordered the commission to give him a license.There’s also a questionable interpretation of events in the book’s final three pages when Kram recounts what some say was a reconciliation that took place at a private dinner between Frazier and Ali during NBA All-Star weekend in 2002. The dinner did happen. And as recounted by Kram, some kind words were spoken. But in truth, Frazier never let go of the bitterness and anger that he felt toward Ali.Kram acknowledges as much when he begins his book by stating in the prologue, “As the years unfolded and Ali grew infirm, as his speech became slurred and his hands increasingly quivered, Frazier appeared to take cruel pleasure in the adversity that had befallen ‘Clay.’ ‘Look at him, and now look at me.’ he told me [Kram] and others. ‘Who do you think came out the winner?’ He had convinced himself that his signature was embossed on the physical wreck Ali had become. Even as friends reminded him that Ali was a sick man and implored him to back off, Frazier could not help himself from battering his erstwhile rival with verbal haymakers.”last_img read more

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