Following the purchase of a new home, Jessica Rudd has sold her Fairfield property

first_imgAlbert Tse and Jessica Rudd have sold their Fairfield home.HOT on the heels of their purchase of a new home at Chelmer, Jessica Rudd, author, online retail business woman and daughter of former Prime Minister Kevin Rudd, has made another property transaction.Ms Rudd and her husband Albert Tse have now sold their Fairfield family home.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoProperty records reveal a deal was done April 6, for $1.18 million through Place — New Farm, which was involved in the couple’s acquisition of their Chelmer home. The Fairfield home sold by Jessica Rudd and Albert Tse. Picture: realestate.com.auThe four-bedroom Fairfield home has been restored and sits on a 809sq m site. It’s listing described it as having a colonial facade, while inside original features including VJ walls and polished timber floors.It has a wraparound veranda and French doors.The main bedroom with ensuite is on the top level of the home. It is close to the Fairfield train station and Fairfield Garden shopping centre.No details yet on who the buyer is.last_img read more

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USC architect works to restore Los Angeles river

first_imgA landscape architect and lecturer at the School of Architecture, Esther Margulies, is working on a plan to restore the Los Angeles River and build an artistic and cultural hub for the city.The L.A. River Public Art Project proposal is a plan to make the L.A. River a vehicle for improving the education and well-being of adjacent communities while bringing a linear arts and culture resource to the city.Margulies is working in collaboration with her former student Jean Yang, an alumna of the School of Architecture, as well as with two architects and a graphic designer. The Los Angeles Nomadic Division, a nonprofit dedicated to public art exhibitions, is also working with the team.Their project aims to develop the 11-mile portion of the river that connects Griffith Park with downtown Los Angeles.“People have been talking about the river for years and years and years, and I think there’s a reason why they are, because it’s a huge wasted opportunity,” Yang said.She said that Los Angeles could emulate other urban landscapes across the country.“When you think about great urban expanses, you think of running along the Charles River in Boston, and the Hudson River in New York, and biking along it and experiencing it,” Yang said. “I think [this plan] adds a new layer to what the L.A. urban experience could be that really wonderful cities like Chicago and [New York City] have already tapped into, something that we’re missing.”The L.A. River Public Art Project proposal is currently competing for a $100,000 grant from LA2050, a development initiative dedicated to improving the Los Angeles area. According to LA2050, Los Angeles has the highest concentration of working artists and arts professionals in the United States.The team is garnering support for the L.A. River Public Art Project from alumni and professional organizations, as well as continuing their social media campaigns. As of press time, the proposal is currently in 25th place for its category. Margulies hopes they will win when the competition for the grant ends on Sept. 16.“L.A. will eventually be passed by in terms of long-term recognition and vitality if it doesn’t consolidate its artistic production quality with lasting infrastructure,” Michael Govan, CEO and Director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, told LA2050.Thie L.A. River Public Art Project proposal, launched in late May of this year, aims to provide a framework of opportunities for residents along the river and for arts institutes nearby.According to the project team’s research, a high school diploma is the highest form of education received by about 52 percent of citizens along the L.A. River. Margulies sees this proposal as an opportunity to improve student achievement in science and technology with their new access to nature and the arts.In 2006, Los Angeles and the federal government initiated a master plan for a 32-mile stretch of the L.A. River, but later narrowed their focus to the 11-mile section that connects Griffith Park and Downtown LA. Though this portion of the river has been studied by the U.S. Army Corps, the Army’s plans are geared towards flood control, habitat restoration and passive recreation.Margulies hopes to focus on other benefits the river has to offer, such as artistic development.“The funding that will fund the Army Corps projects cannot address issues of culture and art, that’s why we wanted to start this project,” she said. “It would be nice, as the river gets done, to build a curated arts and culture plan to go with it.”Besides creating opportunities for work force development, Margulies said that the L.A. River Project would emphasize the importance of the arts in educational neighborhood programs.“[The plan] provides a framework and will define opportunities for local organization, arts institutions and residents to develop programming, education programs and potentially visual art,” she said. “But everyone will have a common vision.”last_img read more

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Syracuse men’s basketball attendance drops 10 percent but SU still finishes 2nd in NCAA report

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse finished second in average home attendance for the 2015-16 season, the NCAA announced in its annual attendance report. Kentucky topped the list, beating out the Orange for the first time since the 2012-13 campaign.SU average attendance declined from 23,854 fans per game in 2014-15 to 21,592 fans this season, a 10 percent fall. Total Carrier Dome attendance was 367,068 in the Orange’s 17 home games.Syracuse finished third behind North Carolina and Kentucky in attendance for all contests, which includes home, road and neutral-site games. A total of 682,039 people attended Syracuse basketball games in 2015-16. Syracuse has finished first in average home attendance 14 times in program history and has placed fourth or better each season since the Carrier Dome opened in 1980. Comments Published on June 9, 2016 at 8:28 pm Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21last_img read more

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Ladies quarter final day at Wimbledon

first_imgDefending champion Serena Williams faces Russia’s Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova. It’s ladies’ quarter-finals day at Wimbledon – but one men’s last-16 match needs to be completed too.Tomas Berdych and Jiri Vesely were level at two-sets-all when bad light stopped play last night.Fourth seed and Australian Open champion Angelique Kerber takes on fifth seed Simona Halep in the pick of today’s ties.last_img

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Keeping ‘Em Flying At Saint Martin’s University: Preparing For World War…

first_imgFacebook54Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Jennifer Crooks, Saint Martin’s University intern to ThurstonTalkFlight classes met at the Olympia Airport. Notice the Buroker/Hicks Flying Service sign on the building. Photo courtesy Olympic Flight Museum.Saint Martin’s University was founded in 1895 in what is now  Lacey, Washington. Originally known as Saint Martin’s College, it became a University in 2005. The only private Benedictine institution of higher education west of the Rockies, this school has been host to a wide variety of programs over the years. One of the more unusual of these was an aviation program.As the United States prepared for World War II, the need for more American pilots became apparent. With the Civil Pilot Training Act of 1939, the federal Civilian Aviation Agency funded flight training at various schools around the nation, including Saint Martin’s College.At first, both female and male applicants were equally accepted into the program, and when classes started at Saint Martin’s College that summer several women were in attendance. At this time, Saint Martin’s was an all-boy’s school run by an all-male faculty, mostly clergy members. These women flight students were the first “co-eds” at Saint Martin’s.The Buroker-Hicks Flying Service provided teachers for the flight program. This Service was a business partnership between Gwin Hicks (1910-2000), Herbert “Herb” Buroker (1895-1973), and Herb’s wife Gladys  Dawson Buroker (1914-2002). Gwin Hicks, the manager of the municipal Olympia Airport, was coordinator and promoter of the program. Herb Buroker, a World War I pilot, served as repairman at the Airport and was also a licensed flight instructor. Gladys Buroker, by teaching in the flight program, became the first female instructor at Saint Martin’s College. She was not the first woman to work at the school. For example, nuns from St. Gertrude’s Priory of Cottonwood, Idaho served in the kitchen from 1904 to 1959.Several Saint Martin’s College students are among the flight students in this image taken at Weeks Field, Idaho. They are standing in front of the College’s “Rangers” bus. Photo courtesy Saint Martin’s University, Ted Yearian photo.Originally from Ferndale, Washington, Gladys was trained to be a pilot by Herb Buroker, her future husband. She quickly fell in love with flying. A unique individual, Gladys excelled in a field dominated by men. She could fly many types of planes, and would later learn how to fly  gliders and even hot air balloons. Barnstorming across Washington in the 1930s, she was also a parachutist. Despite only having received flight instructor certification the year before she came to Saint Martin’s, she eagerly took to the job and proved herself an excellent instructor. She would later recall that her male students accepted her fairly easily.As the program expanded into the fall, Congress passed rules banning women from applying to the civilian fight training program, because graduates were expected to be commissioned into the military. In the fall, the now all male class numbered twenty students. Both Burokers and Hicks served as flight instructors at the school. The Buroker/Hicks Flying Service offered ground school classes at the College on topics like flight theory and navigation with flight instruction at the Olympia Airport.With the declaration of war against Japan in December 1941, civilian aviation was limited on the West Coast as a matter of security. So during the Christmas holidays, the aviation school moved from Olympia inland to Pasco, Washington. They had to move again in January 1942  to Weeks Field near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho when the Navy took over the Pasco airport. Several Saint Martin’s students went along to Idaho to continue their training, accompanied by Father Desmond, (the dean of students) and Father Robert Wippel.In spring 1942, the military took over the Civilian Pilot Training Program nationwide and notified Buroker/Hicks that their contract would terminate when their current students finished the program. After this, another contract was made and War Training aviation students were sent to Weeks Field for Buroker/Hicks for instruction. With the direct connection severed with Saint Martin’s College, Father Desmond returned to Lacey. The Buroker/Hicks partnership amicably dissolved in 1944 after their license with the military expired.Gladys Buroker (pointing at plane model) teaching several students at Saint Martin’s College. Photo courtesy Saint Martin’s University, Ted Yearian photo.The Burokers remained in Idaho and active in aviation. They owned Idaho’s first municipal airport and worked together until Herb’s death in 1973. Gladys became a nurse and remained a flight instructor. She received much recognition for her pioneering work in female aviation before her death in 2002. Gwin Hicks also remained active in aviation. He helped form Zimmerly Airlines in Lewiston, Idaho (later merged with West Coast Airlines), served on various government aviation boards and was a proponent of Lacey history until his death in 2000.Saint Martin’s College offered flight classes into the 1950s. The Buroker/Hicks Flying Service left an impressive record. From 1939 to mid-1942 they taught over 400 students. Many of these pilots served in World War II, participating in combat and support services. Moreover, Gladys Buroker was the first female instructor at the College and some of her students were the first female students at the school.Further ReadingGladys Buroker with Fran Bahr, Wind in My Face: Autobiography of Gladys Dawson Buroker, Pioneer Pilot. (Coeur d’Alene, ID: Action Printers, 1997).Scott, John C.. This Place Called Saint. Martin’s, 1895-1995: A Centennial History of Saint Martin’s College and Abbey, Lacey, Washington. (Virginia Beach, VA: Donning Co.Publishers, 1996).last_img read more

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