New center at Champlain College named for S.D. Ireland Family

first_imgAt a dedication event held on campus on September 17, Champlain College announced its newest academic facility will be named after the S.D. Ireland family, owner of S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction Corp. of Burlington, Vt. The $10 million, state-of-the-art building will be called The S.D. Ireland Family Center for Global Business and Technology.At the center of a major gift to the College are Shelburne, Vt., residents Scott D. Ireland and his wife Kimberly (Wilson) Ireland, who is a 1985 graduate of Champlain College. They were joined by their three children S. Dylan, Shea and Sophie, parents Margaret and Stuart D. Ireland, and brother Stephen D. Ireland at the dedication of the new facility.With three young children, we have a strong interest in education, said Scott D. Ireland. We also like to be associated with cutting-edge initiatives-thats why we wanted to support Champlain College.The Irelands gift of an undisclosed amount, per the wishes of the family, helps fund an academic center that enhances Champlains ability to put students to work on real business and technology projects. The facility includes a market research and strategy room, international business resource center and focus group room, as well as multimedia suites, faculty offices, computer classrooms, and conference rooms.We are so pleased with the Ireland familys generous gift, said Champlain President Dr. Roger H. Perry. Its vitally important to have local support, and were grateful that the Irelands have invested in the future of our institution, which is linked so tightly to Vermont businesses and families.The two organizations share a common goal of creating strong foundations. While Champlain provides solid educational and career footing for many Vermonters, the Irelands have been creating the foundations upon which thousands of family homes and businesses are built, Perry said.This gift brings Champlains Power of Three capital campaign to within $500,000 of its $12 million goal. The campaign supports the construction of three new buildings totaling $31 million: the Center for Global Business and Technology, the Student Life Complex, and the Main Street Suites and Conference Center.We like to support local endeavors, said Kimberly Ireland. Ive seen a wonderful transformation at Champlain College, and I value the professional education I received at the College. The Ireland family has also been supporting cancer research at the University of Vermont College of Medicine. In 1999, they made a $2 million donation to create an endowed professorship at the college. Theyve also created the S.D. Ireland Cancer Research Fund to directly fund the work of UVM cancer researcher Dr. David Krag. Scott D. Ireland has been fighting skin cancer since 1990.S.D. Ireland Concrete Construction is a true family business, encompassing several members of the Ireland family over the years. The company was founded by Stuart D. Ireland in 1972, and his wife Margaret has worked as the treasurer for the business. Their sons Scott D. and Stephen D. Ireland now run the company as president and vice president, respectively, and their daughter Sherrill has also worked in the business. Scotts wife Kimberly has performed human resources and accounting functions in the office, as well, and their three young children are regular visitors to the Grove Street headquarters in Burlington.Stuart D. and Margaret Ireland moved from Rhode Island to Stowe, Vt., in the mid-1960s, where they built and operated the Town & Country Motor Lodge. Stuart developed a residential building company, bought property in Burlington from a defunct concrete company, and set up new concrete batch mixing equipment.S.D. Irelands commercial building business increased as the two sons grew up working in the family business. In fact, the foundation of Champlains Center for Global Business and Technology is made of S.D. Ireland concrete.The company earned a Bronze Award for Best Commercial Development in 2003 from the Home Builders and Remodelers Association of Northern Vermont (HBRA) for their work on the Interstate 89 rest stops in Williston, Vt. In addition, Stuart D. Ireland was honored with the 2000 HBRA Lifetime Achievement Award for a lifetime of dedication to the building profession.last_img read more

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The Marriage Boat: On Reconciling Love and Adventure

first_imgIf you’ve ever paddled in a tandem canoe with your significant other, you know why it’s called the “divorce boat.” Adventures of any kind in the outdoors can either make or break a relationship, so we sat down with three active couples to learn how they navigate the turbulent waters of married life.There’s no better analogy for marriage than sailing the open sea. To quote the 1973 classic hit “Rock the Boat” by Hues Corporation, “Our love is like a ship on the ocean. We’ve been sailing with a cargo full of love and devotion.” But sometimes, the sea, like life, can be a capricious thing, and no matter the amount of love and devotion in the hold of that ship, a little adversity can be all it takes to rock the boat.Early on in their relationship, Harrisonburg, Va., locals Anna and David Landis, were exposed to many a stormy sea. Just a few months after the two started dating, they packed their bags and moved to the Middle East, where they spent nearly a decade living as expats in Israel and Palestine.Anna and David Landis.“When you’re living abroad for that long, your friends cycle in and out, and it can be really refreshing and helpful to have a partner there with you, but that also makes it harder when you have a conflict,” says Anna Landis, “because then, you’re each other’s only steady companion.”Still, living thousands of miles and seven time zones away from family didn’t keep the Landis’ from pushing their limits, both individually and as a couple. In 2009, they each hiked the Camino de Santiago separately, and later returned to hike it together in 2011 and the Camino del Norte route in 2012. They’ve since hiked the Annapurna Circuit, toured cross-country by bike, road tripped throughout Europe and Alaska, and self-published two guidebooks on the Jesus Trail and the Camino de Santiago under their publishing company Village to Village Press. Landis has done more than 20,000 miles of bike touring and has developed a number of long-distance hiking trails in the Middle East, including the Jesus Trail and the Jordan Trail.While they each have fond memories of these adventures together, there was no doubt there were trying times. On that cross-country bike tour, for example, which the couple took just a week after being married and with David’s two sisters and their husbands in tow, Landis remembers feeling self-conscious about her pace.“We were loaded down and averaging 80 miles a day for seven weeks and I was just exhausted,” she says. “This was my first huge tour, and a lot of the times, I would be straggling in after everyone else. I was always the slowest one. It’s already kinda stressful to do those big long days, but to feel like you’re letting people down, that was tough sometimes.”Lydia Wing of Saluda, N.C., remembers that feeling of insecurity, which is why she didn’t paddle with her then-boyfriend Chris, an experienced kayaking instructor and Wave Sport sponsored freestyle competitor, when she was first learning to kayak. She paddled with her parents instead.Lydia and Chris Wing“The beginner progression can be challenging and frustrating and sometimes you feel embarrassed holding the group back,” she says. “I tended to funnel those frustrations into anger, so I started paddling with my parents a lot because my mom couldn’t break up with me if I got mad at her while we were kayaking.”Once Lydia felt confident on the water, she and Chris started paddling harder whitewater together, but even then, the two encountered a different set of challenges, namely, how to continue giving Lydia the room to develop herself as a competent paddler.“Whether it’s in the eddy above the rapid or picking up the pieces at the bottom, being able to sort through what you’re feeling and have your counterpart listen and not just tell you what you want to hear but empower you and validate how you’re feeling, that’s really important,” says Lydia. “We weren’t good at that for a long time and there were times on the river that were stressful and heated.”“There is no hiding your emotions while kayaking,” says Chris. “All of your insecurities and fears surface, no matter what, and it comes out in different ways. Sometimes I’m too empathetic because I coach and teach so much. I have to be able to turn off that coach and be a husband as well, and that’s my biggest challenge.”In 2012, Chris and Lydia started H2o Dreams, a kayak instruction school offering everything from beginner roll clinics to international paddling trips. All of a sudden, the couple wasn’t just living and playing together—they were now working together, too. Not long after the two embarked on this entrepreneurial enterprise, Lydia started having doubts.“A lot of people will laugh when I say this but I really experienced a quarter-life crisis,” Lydia says. “I freaked out because I went to college and then I met this guy and this job working with him totally fell into my lap. I started to wonder what I would do if it weren’t for Chris, like who would I be and what would I be doing?”[nextpage title=”READ ON!”]The All-or-Nothing MarriageWhat Lydia experienced is something an increasing number of modern day couples are having to confront, and that is the question of whether or not your significant other should help you achieve self-actualization. Last year, Northwestern University social psychologist Eli Finkle published a book called The All-or-Nothing Marriage. In it, Finkle compares the history of marriage to Maslow’s hierarchy of needs.Up until 1850, a successful marriage was defined by the meeting of basic needs such as “food production, shelter and protection from violence,” writes Finkle in a 2014 New York Times op-ed. From 1850 until 1965, “marriage increasingly centered around intimate needs such as to love, to be loved and to experience a fulfilling sex life.”But from 1965 until today, Americans, who more or less had those fundamental needs met, looked to marriage for self-discovery, the pinnacle of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. That, according to Finkle, is leading to either record-high levels of marital quality, or marriages that fall drastically short of a partner’s expectations.Lydia, recognizing that Chris couldn’t possibly answer those questions for her, made a leap. She started working for a non-profit, and although she didn’t work there long, it returned that sense of sovereignty over her life that had been missing.“I recognized pretty early on that John couldn’t be my everything, which is probably why I’ve survived being a weekend bike widow for so long,” says Rebecca. “Before, because I was so profoundly unhappy in my career choices, I was resentful of this great joy that John had. But if you stop thinking about the things that take your partner away from you and start thinking about the space that that gives you to find your passions, you’ll come much closer together.”Rebecca Herod of Morgantown, W.Va., had a harder time making that dive. She and her husband John had, by all appearances, a successful life. She was the Director of Marketing and Communications at West Virginia University. John had his own lucrative contracting business. The two owned a house and doted on their two dogs. Despite the unquestionable love they had for each other, John had another love, too—mountain biking. The sport was part of John’s very essence, an activity he’d been doing since he was just a child. He’d been a competitive downhill racer for years, traveling almost every weekend during the season, but even now as co-founder of the West Virginia Enduro Series, he was out of town a lot.“Early on in the relationship he was out having a good time [mountain biking] and I was working all of the time and not having fun,” says Rebecca. “That wasn’t his problem though. That was my problem. His happiness didn’t need to get smaller. Mine needed to get bigger.”When the stress of her work started to negatively impact her physical and mental well-being, Rebecca turned to yoga. At first, yoga was purely a personal pursuit, but she felt such fulfillment from her practice that she decided to quit her job and begin teaching yoga.“I left a very lucrative position at the university to be a yoga teacher which, contrary to popular belief, is not a money-making venture,” she says. “I was worried when I did that because we had a certain lifestyle and that was going to change. I was afraid that would put strain on our marriage and our finances.”As a self-employed entrepreneur and downhill mountain biker, John was no stranger to risk. He understood Rebecca’s fear of the unknown and her simultaneous need to confront that uncertainty head-on. Much like mountain biking served as an outlet for stress relief and purpose in his life, he recognized that yoga played a similar role in Rebecca’s.“Although we don’t do those two things together, it works for us,” he says. “Everyone needs mind-cleansing activities. You can’t always rely on your partner to make your world perfect.”Shifting the ParadigmWhether you’re in a relationship like John and Rebecca, who maintain separate passions, or like Chris and Lydia, who live, work, and play together, time spent outdoors shouldn’t cause stress on the relationship. If it does, the first thing you should do is set a regular date night.According to a 2012 study released by the University of Virginia’s National Marriage Project, date nights can improve the overall quality and stability of relationships and marriages. Spouses who spent deliberate “time alone, talking, or sharing an activity” at least once a week “were approximately 3.5 times more likely to report being ‘very happy’ in their marriages, compared to those who enjoyed less quality time with their spouse.”Life for Anna and David has changed dramatically in recent years. For starters, the couple now has two kids under the age of three, which make scheduling date nights seemingly impossible. And while David decided all of those years ago during his first thru-hike of the Camino de Santiago that he preferred to adventure with his wife by his side, he’s had to adapt the activities that give him such fulfillment to be more inclusive for his family. This past summer, the four-person tribe headed West so that David could bike the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route in the company of Anna and their two kids, who met up with him along the way.“I like going hard and going fast, there’s no doubt,” he says, “but I think the greater value is being outside and being together.”John and Rebecca make a point of designating Thursday nights as date night. The evening’s activities must be “neutral ground,” which means no yoga and no mountain biking. The two typically go out to dinner, see a concert, or simply stay at home and binge watch Stranger Things and Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency.Chris (right) and Lydia Wing live, work, and play together, which makes time for date nights more important than ever.Chris and Lydia admit that date nights are few and far between. “We’re married and we kayak together and we started our own business together. There are a lot of blurred lines,” says Lydia. But when they first started dating, and before Lydia began kayaking, the couple went on really cool dates and shared new experiences, which they say they’d like to return to.“It’s systemic in our culture that that sacred time is one of the first things that falls to the wayside,” says Chris. “We’re so motivated and so driven and so career-oriented that we forget about the things that bring real joy in our lives.”Additionally, social psychologist Eli Finkle argues that it’s perfectly acceptable for couples to look to each other for support in achieving self-actualization, if those expectations are clearly communicated and the couples are willing to put in the hard work (read “more date nights”) to make that happen. But, says Finkle, “if couples lack the time and energy, they might consider adjusting their expectations, perhaps by focusing on cultivating an affectionate bond without trying to facilitate each other’s self-actualization.”“I recognized pretty early on that John couldn’t be my everything, which is probably why I’ve survived being a weekend bike widow for so long,” says Rebecca. “Before, because I was so profoundly unhappy in my career choices, I was resentful of this great joy that John had. But if you stop thinking about the things that take your partner away from you and start thinking about the space that that gives you to find your passions, you’ll come much closer together. You don’t have to share the same love affair with biking, but you do have to recognize how that love affair enhances the soul. You want to be with somebody who’s got a soulful love. It just makes us whole people.”last_img read more

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Enjoying the Republicans’ Latest Game Show: Their Fourth Debate in Milwaukee

first_imgView image | gettyimages.comLive from the Milwaukee Theater, it’s the fourth GOP presidential debate!Tuesday night’s prime-time show featured a big cast of characters, even though a few wannabes from the previous episode had been dropped in this ongoing political comedy series (or tragedy, depending on your point of view) due to their low ratings.On hand for the main event in Wisconsin were Donald Trump, Ben Carson, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Jeb Bush—it’s okay, catch your breath—Carly Fiorina, John Kasich and Rand Paul. Each of them was individually “WHOOED!” like a celebrity rock star as they were introduced. They were the top draw at 9 p.m. on the Fox Business Network, which sponsored the program with the Wall Street Journal, both with ties to Rupert Murdoch’s media empire. At 7 p.m. the “happy hour” debate had Chris Christie, Bobby Jindal, Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum. But who except the hardcore conservative would want to put in four hours watching all this in one night? Get a life, people!The debate rules were simple: 90-second answers. If a candidate talked for too long, they were supposed to shut up (but totally didn’t) at the sound of a bing-bing.“It sounds like a game show, but it’s not,” joked moderator Neil Cavuto, Fox Business Network managing editor, who failed as both a comedian and a persuader.Two minutes prior, inspirational music had played to dramatic retellings in what may as well have been a “Previously in Wisconsin” clip. In 1859, we learned that the so-called “black president” Abe Lincoln (a Republican, no less) had campaigned in Milwaukee. In 1912, a few blocks away from this debate venue, Teddy Roosevelt (then a Progressive Party candidate, no longer a Republican) had given a 90-minute speech with a bullet lodged in his chest after he’d just been shot outside his hotel by an unemployed saloon keeper. And, of course, no conservatively biased video is complete without a cameo from their true Lord and Savior, Ronald Regan, who praised the Badger State’s Brew City for all its worth.In short, Neil Cavuto got it wrong. American presidential campaigns have always been a game, whether it’s TR capitalizing on a shooting for sympathy, Reagan sucking up to Milwaukee, or the Fox Business Network using those stories to choke up nostalgic patriots. America loves drama – especially evocative legends of bravery and heroism, even if they all were just an act – and in less than three minutes of this Republican debate, the storyboard was set and the pieces were moving.Two hours of 90-second-plus monologues wooed viewers with conservative wet dreams. Good America vs. Evil: like illegal immigration, Obamacare, and Putin. Bonus claps were earned if someone badmouthed Hilary Clinton or strategically brownnosed America’s military the night before Veterans Day.“I know that the world is a safer place when the United States is the strongest military power in the world,” said Marco Rubio.“We have to make our military bigger, better, stronger than ever before so that nobody messes with us,” echoed Donald Trump.“We have the strongest military on the face of the planet, and everyone knows it,” copied Carly Fiorina.They said a whole lot of nothing and something at the same time, and that something was whatever earned them brownie points. After all, who doesn’t love being praised?The remaining highlights were when the candidates disputed each other, their outraged voices blended together, the commentators attempted (and failed) to control the outburst, and mostly notably, the crowd whooped and booed.Fox Business Network decided who would attend the debate based on four recent polls, which I’m guessing asked, “Which candidates will get us the highest ratings?”The debate averaged 13.5 million viewers, which was 13.5 million viewers too many, as far as I’m concerned, but the most audience this cable network reportedly has ever gotten.But let’s be honest. Following the November 2016 presidential elections in November 2015 indicates a lack of true entertainment in one’s life. Find something else to watch on TV, people.The Democratic debate will be held this Saturday, Nov. 14, in Des Moines, Iowa. But The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 also opens in theaters this weekend. The fifth GOP debate will be Tuesday, Dec. 15, in Las Vegas. You know, where there are casinos. They’re a better bet if you actually want to win something. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

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Salmonella cases trigger almond recall

first_img The FDA said it was working with other health authorities to trace the source of the potentially contaminated products. About 57 people in Wheaton, Ill., became ill in February after eating basil and mesclun prepared by a restaurant, the FDA said in an alert to consumers. Twenty of the cases were confirmed as cyclosporiasis. The same month, 38 people in Irving, Tex., fell ill after eating basil and mesclun at a local restaurant, and 16 cases were confirmed as cyclosporiasis. May 24, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Two outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness caused by the parasite Cyclospora may have been associated with raw basil and “mesculin [mesclun]/spring mix salad” served at restaurants in Illinois and Texas, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Cyclosporiasis, an infection of the small intestine, causes watery diarrhea with frequent, sometimes explosive, bowel movements, the FDA said. Other symptoms include loss of appetite, weight loss, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches, low-grade fever, and fatigue. Symptoms usually appear about a week after eating contaminated food. Cyclosporiasis was little-known until the 1990s, according to a 2000 report in Clinical Infectious Diseases. In 1996 a multistate outbreak in the United States and Canada was traced to Guatemalan strawberries, demonstrating that the illness is spread by food, according to the report.center_img See also: The FDA said the infection can be treated with antibiotics. People experiencing the above symptoms after eating basil and mesclun or spring mix salads should consult a physician and notify their local health department, the agency said. May 21 FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2004/ucm108304.htmlast_img read more

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MLAX : With SU’s Lade out of lineup, Pannell explodes for 6 points

first_img Published on April 12, 2011 at 12:00 pm Contact Chris: cjiseman@syr.edu | @chris_iseman Rob Pannell was as impossible to stop as he looked on film. He made perfect passes and dodged around his defenders with ease.When he wasn’t scoring, he was assisting, and vice versa. Pannell assisted Cornell’s first two goals and finished with three goals and three assists. The Cornell crowd that filled the Carrier Dome stands began the game with ‘Not that good’ chants, and Pannell’s play exposed SU all night to back them up.‘We understood that they were going to come out and play full, 100 percent lacrosse,’ Syracuse goaltender John Galloway said. ‘Pannell’s just such a talented player. We’ve seen it in every game he’s played, that he’s going to find those guys.’The Big Red was the better team in all aspects of the game Tuesday, led by another stellar performance from its star attack Pannell. No matter how hard Syracuse tried, it couldn’t find a way to stop the Big Red, suffering an 11-6 loss for its first defeat of the season. Pannell finished with six points, just above his nation-leading average of 5.5 per game.Cornell was looking for revenge off two last-second losses in a row to the Orange, and it was looking to be the better team. It came into the Dome and enacted that plan, due in large part to its high-octane offense.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textFor the first time this season, the Orange ran into a team that capitalized on its mistakes with ease. By the end of the first quarter Tuesday, SU was down by four and looked lost trying to halt the Big Red’s scoring. It looked helpless when trying to score. Cornell’s defense bared down on Syracuse’s scorers to make sure they never got close to the net.The Orange has recently relied on scoring from the crease. The Big Red made sure that didn’t happen, and forced it to take inaccurate shots from the outside.SU head coach John Desko wasn’t prepared to say his team didn’t play well. Instead, he said it was simply a matter of Cornell playing better. That was evident from the start, as Cornell jumped out to a 3-0 lead, thanks in part to Pannell’s precise passes. The Orange was left in an unfamiliar position.‘They played great defensively, they got all over us,’ Desko said. ‘They pushed the ball, they took quick opportunities. My hat’s off to them.’Cornell has one of the highest scoring offenses in the country, averaging 13 goals per game. With a sputtering offense of its own, Syracuse had to find a way to slow the Big Red’s scorers down. It never did.Pannell, specifically, dominated the Orange. Not making anything easier for Syracuse was the fact that its top defender, John Lade, couldn’t make it through the first quarter. Still recovering from a twisted ankle he suffered in SU’s game against Duke two weekends ago, Lade had to relinquish the job of stopping Pannell to sophomore defender Brian Megill.Syracuse felt his loss.With Cornell leading 4-1 at the end of the first quarter, Pannell fought off Megill just to the left of the crease. He flipped a seamless pass to Steve Mock, who flipped it into the cage from the lip of the crease. Not even 30 seconds later, Pannell ran through SU’s defense, made a perfect dodge around Megill and shot into the lower left corner of the goal right past Galloway.‘I was ready for the matchup, whether (Lade) played or not,’ Pannell said. ‘I was certainly preparing for him to play. They put someone else on me, and I was just going to play my role within our offense. It was kind of good to see that I don’t have to go up against him because he’s a great defenseman.’When the contest was over, Syracuse was left to walk off its field as the losing team for the first time all season. The Orange was dominated from the start of the game.For at least one night, Syracuse was not the best team.‘It’s just great to come up here and get a great win against a team like Syracuse,’ Pannell said. ‘It’s the No. 1 team in the country, it had an undefeated record. To get a win here is great for our team.’cjiseman@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

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Football searches for momentum amid coaching changes

first_imgRedshirt sophomore wide receiver Velus Jones runs for open ground in USC’s game against Arizona State. (Emily Smith | Daily Trojan)In the wake of freshman quarterback JT Daniels’ return and the transfer of control over the offense from offensive coordinator Tee Martin to head coach Clay Helton, Wednesday’s practice was a calm affair for the Trojans as the team prepared to face Oregon State.It was the second day of practice for offensive line coach Tim Drevno, and Helton said that the new coach is focusing on bringing a new emphasis on fundamentals. He also announced the introduction of graduate assistant Mike Goff as the new interim coach to fill out the staff ahead of Saturday’s game.On an otherwise lowkey day of practice, one statement stood out — the seniors made a choice as a group to ignore the typical practice of  “No-Pads-November,” which previously meant spending the last month of the season without pads on during any practice sessions. In the past, this was done in an attempt to ease players through the final few weeks of the season without injuries, and to help players suffering from any nagging soreness or tweaks to fully recover without the risk of agitating something in practice. “They want a sense of urgency, to have a great November, and I commend them,” Helton said. “They want to leave their legacy. They want to show young people exactly how you treat a November and how you practice.”This year, however, that won’t be an option, Helton said. The seniors decided that the team isn’t playing physical enough in games to earn the final month of rest in practice. Although there are only a handful of games left, he said that the seniors feel the team still lacks in physical play on both sides of the ball — the defense is struggling to wrap up tackles and make big plays, and the offense isn’t finding a way to power through hits and hard blocking up front.The decision to forego “No-Pads-November” came after the return of key players, including Daniels and senior captain and linebacker Cam Smith. On the defensive side, Smith’s return has offered a sense of calm for a team that struggled to find its rhythm without the leader at its core in past weeks. At middle linebacker, Helton said, Smith has an ability to direct traffic that comes with experience, not just talent. While Helton acknowledged that freshman linebacker Palaie Gaoteote IV was “phenomenal” in his ability to step up well in Smith’s absence, wrapping up five tackles against Arizona State, he believes that the return of a senior leader will make a difference in the at defense.“It’s tough for anyone to sit on the sideline and watch but I had a lot of fun,” Smith said. “I got to see things from a different point and helped out some guys. We always talk about how you learn more when you teach, so I got to watch some guys and I think some guys made some huge strides.”The defense in particular is continuing to be forced to make adjustments due to injuries, especially in the secondary. Senior safety Marvell Tell played teacher again on Wednesday as he worked with wide receiver Ajene Harris on repetitions at the safety spot. Tell has been forced to work in this mentorship role throughout the season, as the secondary rotated through losses due to suspensions, academic issues and injury. Helton pointed out that this is a key area that the senior and captain has been able to step up for his team.Injury ReportFew changes were made to the injury report between Tuesday and Wednesday. Junior linebacker Jordan Iosefa suited up but remained out of practice after suffering an AC sprain. Linebacker John Houston is also limited after coming up gimpy with an ankle injury during team period on Tuesday.Redshirt senior tight end Austin Applebee remains sidelined, along with sophomore wide receiver Randal Grimes. The defense is continuing to suffer the brunt of major injuries, with junior defensive linemen Connor Murphy and Caleb Tremblay remaining out of practice, along with sophomore linebacker Levi Jones and freshman defensive back Chase Williams. A total of 15 scholarship players are on the sidelines for the Trojans headed into Saturday’s game.last_img read more

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McGregor suspended over injuries

first_imgConor McGregor could be out of action for the rest of the year after receiving a six month medical suspension.McGregor has been temporarily suspended following an assessment of the injuries he suffered in his victory over Nate Diaz at UFC 202.The Irishman will not be allowed to fight competitively again until at least next February, unless he gets clearance from an orthopaedic doctor.last_img

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Fixing conference championships could solidify College Football Playoff for good

first_imgThe College Football Playoff era doesn’t mesh well with the Power 5 conference championship model, and that’s on display now more than ever heading into the final weekend before this year’s pairings are announced.No. 1 Alabama takes on No. 4 Georgia in the marquee matchup in the SEC championship game, but the Crimson Tide are 13-point favorites and still could end up in the Playoff if they lose. The rest of the Power 5 conference championships leave little room for drama. MORE: Week 14 bowl projectionsNo. 2 Clemson is a 27.5-point favorite against five-loss Pitt in the ACC championship game. No. 6 Ohio State is a 14-point favorite against four-loss Northwestern in the Big Ten championship game. No. 5 Oklahoma meets No. 9 Texas in a rematch from the regular season in the Big 12 championship, but the Sooners are the only team in that matchup who can make the Playoff. No. 10 Washington and No. 15 Utah play in a Pac-12 championship game that has no impact on the Playoff.That’s the landscape of the Power 5.MatchupSpreadNo. 2 Clemson (12-0) vs. Pittsburgh (7-5)27.5No. 6 Ohio State (11-1) vs. No. 21 Northwestern (8-4)14No. 1 Alabama (12-0) vs. No. 4 Georgia (11-1)13No. 5 Oklahoma (11-1) vs. No. 9 Texas (9-3)8No. 10 Washington (9-3) vs. No. 17 Utah (9-3)5The biggest problem? In the Playoff era, only three Power 5 conference championship games guaranteed the winner would reach the College Football Playoff. That was Michigan State-Iowa in 2015 and Auburn-Georgia and Miami-Clemson in 2017. North Carolina could have created an interesting discussion if it had beaten Clemson in the 2015 ACC championship, but one-loss Ohio State could just as easily sneaked in ahead of the Tar Heels.This year, however, only one game has such stakes: Georgia vs. Alabama.”The playing field is not level for all teams relative to conference championship games,” Alabama coach Nick Saban said on the SEC championship game teleconference Sunday. “They have them. They don’t have them. Who they play; who they don’t play. It is what it is, and it’s the challenge we have before us. I don’t really have an opinion right now on expanding playoffs and eliminating championship games and all that. I really just never, ever thought about it.”Almost everybody else has thought about it and has opinions on the subject. Alabama doesn’t have to think about it as much, especially after reaching the Playoff without winning the SEC championship last season. The call to expand the Playoff and/or eliminate conference championships exists for a reason, and it’s because of that disconnected relationship between the two.Will that disconnect need to be fixed down the line?  “There are two ways you can go about it,” Fox analyst Joel Klatt told Sporting News. “You can either fix the conference championships and, in turn, make a small tweak to the Playoff, or you can blow the Playoff up and the conference championship game weekend and try to build something that is an eight-team model. I don’t know what the appetite is.”Oh, that appetite is out there, especially when there are alternatives worth exploring for conference championship weekend.* * * *The intent of conference championship games is to be a de facto quarterfinal round for the College Football Playoff. That’s how Clemson coach Dabo Swinney, who has the Tigers in the ACC championship game for the fourth consecutive year, chooses to look at it. “It is a Playoff,” Swinney said on the ACC teleconference Sunday. “Just go lose the game, you’ll find out. There’s no question. I think every game is a Playoff game, to be honest with you. Those games in September matter. Those games in October matter. That’s what to me is great about college football.”That’s where Swinney is right. Clemson is 3-0 in ACC championship games since the Playoff era and would be in an uncomfortable position if it lost to Pitt on Saturday.Where is he wrong? If there’s an upset — and that isn’t happening. Of the 17 Power 5 conference championship games played since 2014, the higher-ranked team is 13-4, and the average margin of victory in those games is 23.5 points per game. Of the four upsets, Michigan State (2015) and Georgia (2017) were the teams that made the Playoff. Penn State (2016) and Ohio State (2017) did not.MORE: Ohio State or Oklahoma more deserving of Playoff?The challenge for coaches like Ohio State’s Urban Meyer is to maintain the focus on the conference championship, even if the debate between the Buckeyes and Sooners for the final Playoff spot is already out in full force.”I don’t believe other than kids staring at their phones that there will be a lot of conversation about it,” Meyer said about the Playoff. “You get a ring when you win this (Big Ten) championship. That’s the conversation always around here.”Perceptions can change with the help of a conference championship performance, which the Buckeyes know well from a 59-0 victory over Wisconsin in the Big Ten championship game in 2014. That helped vault the Buckeyes over TCU in the rankings and spur them on to the first championship of the Playoff era.On the flip side, Ohio State could be the third consecutive Big Ten champion to be left out of the Playoff, even if it does beat Northwestern, which heads into Indianapolis looking to play spoiler. Wildcats coach Pat Fitzgerald knows the disparity, but he also points to the player safety issues that come with adding more games.”I haven’t seen anybody articulate how you add more than what we have right now and still keep every game significant,” Fitzgerald said. “It has to protect the bowl season, which rewards teams for having a successful season.”Give us two chances to try, coach.  * * * *Klatt offers two possible solutions for conference championship weekend. The first involves a few tweaks to the current four-team model.  “You get rid of divisions and let the top two teams play in the conference championship with a more round-robin style of schedule so you would get rid of inequities with cross-division schedules in every conference,” Klatt said. “In the five autonomous conferences, that would give you 10 of the top 12 or 13 teams in the country, in theory. That would be a de facto quarterfinal, with the other tweak being you have to win your conference in order to go (to the Playoff).”How would that look this year if you eliminated divisions within the Power 5 conferences?No. 2 Clemson vs. Pitt No. 5 Oklahoma vs. No. 9 TexasNo. 6 Ohio State vs. No. 8 Michigan
No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 4 Georgia
No. 10 Washington vs. No. 12 Washington StateThe flaw here would be rematches with Washington-Washington State and Ohio State-Michigan, and that would devalue the regular-season rivalry matchups. The Big 12, however, has a no-division formula that creates an intriguing rematch with Oklahoma and Texas. It goes both ways.  Klatt offers the more popular alternative, which is an expansion to eight teams.”You can say we’re all going to get rid of our championship game and go to eight and we’re going to play on site on championship game weekend for the round of the quarterfinals, and will (have) 1-8, 2-7 and so on,” Klatt said.  MORE: One reason to watch every conference title gameIn other words, ditch conference championship weekend, put the top eight teams in the Playoff at the end of the regular season and put those first-round games on campus.Here’s what that would look like using the latest set of College Football Rankings:No. 1 Alabama vs. No. 8 UCFNo. 4 Georgia vs. No. 5 OklahomaNo. 2 Clemson vs. No. 7 Michigan
No. 3 Notre Dame vs. No. 6 Ohio StateImagine Oklahoma at Georgia and Ohio State at Notre Dame in the first weekend of December. That’s pretty good, and it would end the Playoff expansion debate at the best possible spot.What’s the biggest drawback to that plan? It wouldn’t look like this every year, and in this scenario the Pac-12 champion still isn’t in. We’d still be arguing over No. 8. “If you go that route, a lot of these games become irrelevant,” Swinney said. “People start resting their players, not playing people just like you see in all the other leagues because they already know they got their spot in the playoffs locked up.”Klatt still sees the fervor for the second one building with each season, even if he prefers the slight tweaks to the first scenario.”There is more of an appetite for the second scenario laid out,” Klatt said.The conference championship has a different meaning for different programs. For Fitzgerald, it’s a chance for Northwestern to win its way into a larger conversation, even if it isn’t the College Football Playoff.”Division I does not have the expanded playoffs that some other (college) divisions or maybe the NFL has, but we really have to think hard if we’re going to change and add more teams,” Fitzgerald said.MORE: Week 13 rankings: Michigan, Washington State fallThe problem is the two scenarios Klatt outlined aren’t perfect either. Some fans want eight teams, perhaps with automatic bids for each of the Power 5 conference champions; others like the current four-team model. Still others preferred the old BCS computer model. It still meshes with the regular season and bowl system — for now.”I love the bowl system,” Swinney said. “I think we got a great mix the way it is. I love the fact that tons of teams get an opportunity to develop and end their season with a win. I think that makes college football unique, but yet also still has an opportunity to settle who the national champion is instead of somebody voting on it.”The conference championships and four-team Playoff have achieved that, but a committee still decides the four teams. No coach knows that more than Meyer. The Buckeyes leapfrogged TCU in 2014 with a conference championship, stayed ahead of Penn State to get in without a conference championship in 2016 and missed the Playoff with a conference championship in 2017. Now, the Buckeyes are in a similar debate with Oklahoma heading into conference championship weekend.”We’ve been involved in the conversation every year and I really don’t believe that has any impact at all on this week of practice,” Meyer said. “It makes for a pretty intense Sunday of watching.”That much is true, but it would be better for the sport if conference championship Saturday was just as intense before the Playoff pairings are announced. That mesh point does not fit like it used to. After Saturday, it will be interesting to see how much more it can take before it truly does need to expand.last_img read more

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Zion Williamson on leading Duke: ‘I don’t feel the pressure’

first_imgZion Williamson has played an integral role in leading Duke during the regular season and through the NCAA Tournament, but the star forward said he doesn’t “really feel the pressure.” At just 18 years old, Williamson has come up big down the stretch when the Blue Devils needed it most. Of the four conference games Duke lost this season, Williamson was out for three recovering from a knee sprain. He helped secure the ACC Tournament victory against North Carolina with 31 points and 11 rebounds. And when it looked like Central Florida was going to win the second round of the NCAA Tournament, Williamson dropped another 32 points and 11 rebounds.  But Williamson doesn’t believe he needs to have a “monster game” every night because of the depth Duke has with freshmen R.J. Barrett and Cam Reddish. “I don’t feel the pressure to have that every game because we have a lot of talented players on this team,” Williamson told reporters. “So like we just move the ball and attack. And whoever has the hot hand, that’s who is going to have the monster night.” Related News Mike Krzyzewski on Duke’s freshmen: ‘If you like basketball, you should like these kids’ Junior forward Jack White gave credit to Williamson for how he has handled the expectations this season.“He always handles it all in a great way,” White said (via USA Today). “Just being around him every day, if you didn’t know that, then you’d have no idea about all the attention he receives. He’s just like another guy on our team, really, in how he acts and carries himself. And as a teammate, he’s just great. He’s just all about winning. He just lets his game do the talking.”center_img Coach Mike Krzyzewski, however, acknowledged “there’s pressure on us all the time” and addressed some of the expectations that come from being a Blue Devil.“You have to make sure that you’re adapting to coaching a young group at this time in civilization, and not four years ago or five years ago,” Krzyzewski said. “And these guys have been really good to adapt to. Our program has incredibly high expectations from within and from without. And that’s good. And so if we succeed, we succeed famously. And if we do not succeed, we have tried to succeed famously. And I like that aspect of our program immensely.”East Region’s top-seed Duke will face No. 4 Virginia Tech in the Sweet 16 on Friday, with tip off set for 9:39 p.m. ET. Duke star Zion Williamson explains why he never considered shutting it down after injurylast_img read more

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Up The League – Saturday, August 22

first_imgJoin Geoff Peters for all the latest Football League news as he looks ahead to another action-packed weekend.Coventry captain Sam Ricketts tells us about their good start to the season, Crawley boss Mark Yates on the ambitions for the League 2 club and ex-Middlesbrough midfielder Neil Maddison talks up thier promotion hopes.last_img

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