World Court to decide on jurisdiction after February 2019 – Greenidge

first_imgGuyana-Venezuela border controversy– Ministry launches PSAs to increase awareness The International Court of Justice (ICJ) will early next year make a determination on whether or not it is its jurisdiction to hear the matter relating to the Guyana-Venezuela border controversy.This was related by Foreign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge who disclosed on Thursday that the delay was based by an objection by the Bolivarian Republic which said it “does not recognise” the ICJ’s jurisdiction.“It will be sometime after February next year that the court will decide on jurisdiction,” the Foreign Affairs Minister posited.Greenidge said after such time, the court will proceed with the substantive case which could be heard in two years’ time.In the meantime, the Foreign Affairs Ministry collaborated with the Education Ministry and launched two Public Service Announcements (PSAs) on the Guyana-Venezuela border controversy. This seeks to inform and update the public on the ongoing matter which is currently gaining the attention of the ICJ in Hague, The Netherlands. The PSAs are available on Facebook and YouTube and will soon be broadcast on television in the near future.Venezuela claims the entire Essequibo region but according to Guyana’s application to the World Court, for more than 60 years Venezuela had consistently recognised and respected the validity of the binding force of the 1899 Award and the 1905 map agreed by both sides in furtherance of the award.On March 29, 2018, Guyana filed an application requesting the World Court to confirm the legal validity and binding effect of the 1899 Arbitral Award regarding its boundary with Venezuela. This application followed a decision by the UN Secretary General earlier this year in choosing the ICJ as the next means of resolving the controversy that arose as a result of the Venezuelan contention that the Arbitral Award of 1899 about the frontier between British Guiana and Venezuela was null and void.The court documents noted that while Venezuela has never produced any evidence to justify its belated repudiation of the 1899 Award, the neighbouring country has used it as an excuse to occupy territory awarded to Guyana in 1899, to inhibit Guyana’s economic development, and to violate Guyana’s sovereignty and sovereign rights.In filing the application, Foreign Affairs Minister Carl Greenidge, who will serve as Guyana’s agent in the proceedings before the ICJ, said: “… Guyana has respected the Secretary General’s decision and placed its faith in the International Court of Justice to resolve the controversy in accordance with its statue and jurisprudence, based on the fundamental principles of international law, including the sanctity of treaties, the maintenance of settled boundaries and respect for the sovereignty and territorial integrity of States.”On January 30, 2018, Secretary General Antonio Guterres, concluded that the Good Offices Process – which the parties had engaged in for almost 30 years, but failed to achieve a solution to the controversy – and chose the ICJ as the next means of settlement, for which Guyana has long been advocating. United States oil giant ExxonMobil had announced back in May 2015 that it had found oil offshore Guyana. Venezuela has staunchly been against oil exploration in Guyana’s Stabroek Block, where multiple oil deposits were found by ExxonMobil, and has since renewed claims to the Essequibo region. (Shemuel Fanfair)last_img read more

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DDL Chairman calls for more attention to manufacturing sector

first_img…says local exporters must lift standardsWith Guyana’s Balance of Payment position showing a US$69.5 million deficit last year, Demerara Distillers Limited (DDL) Chairman Komal Samaroo on Thursday made a charge for more emphasis to be placed on developing the manufacturing and export sector.DDL Chairman Komal SamarooSamaroo was at the time addressing persons gathered for the launch of the Georgetown Chamber of Commerce and Industry’s business magazine. The business executive warned that, with the global market as competitive as it is, more needs to be done to lift local standards.He noted that to do this, high levels of technical competence and discipline are needed; but, he said, there are challenges even with these lofty goals. Here he was referring to the bureaucracy some manufacturers must deal with when transacting their business.“In today’s world, the advance in the digital and artificial technology is transforming all aspects of business,” he related. “It is important that our education system in Guyana be revamped to produce people who are fully equipped with the skillsets to manage businesses in the Technical Age.“Even today, about a quarter of the US economy consists of manufacturing of physical goods. When you add the distribution and sales to retail outlets, you are talking closer to three quarters of the US economy,” he disclosed.Samaroo pointed to statistics that a quarter of the US economy is made up of manufacturing physical goods. This, he said, coupled with distribution and sales to retail outlets, means the superpower economy is built largely around manufacturing.“We have to export to international and regional markets. The international market is very competitive, complex and constantly changing. If one is to be successful, one has to be equipped with the market data to respond to those changes,” he cautioned.“Our production system must meet international levels at all times, and this requires a high level of technical competence and discipline in management of manufacturing companies,” Samaroo related.Balance of paymentsTo record a deficit in the Balance of Payments, Guyana would have had to spend more on imports, among other things, that it derived from exports. And indeed, the 2017 macroeconomic report speaks to below projected merchandise export earnings.According to the report, Guyana’s overall balance of payments in the 2017 fiscal year showed a deficit of US$69.5 million. This is a hike when compared to US$53.3 million the previous year. A breakdown of the figures shows disparities.On the one hand, the Current Account shows a deficit of US$287.4 million for the year 2017. But in the previous fiscal year, the report notes, this was just US$12.4 million. The report admits that this is because of a negative balance on the merchandise trade account.“The further weakening was due to the negative balance on the merchandise trade account. Merchandise exports were slightly lower than projected, mainly on account of lower export earnings of gold and other exports in the last two months of the year,” the report states.When Finance Minister Winston Jordan presented the 2018 budget last year, he had announced that merchandise imports were estimated to grow by 9.6 per cent. This had been attributed to increased imports of mining machinery, chemicals, fuel and lubricants. According to the report, imports exceeded the Government’s projections.“Imports were slightly more than the US$1.59 billion projected at the time of the presentation of the 2018 budget. As a result, the merchandise trade deficit of US$196.2 million was considerably higher than the projected deficit of US$147.2 million.“Notwithstanding, the deficit on the services account was lower than estimated… the improvement in the services account more than offsets the weaker balances on both the non-factor services and unrequited transfers accounts,” the report states. (Jarryl Bryan)last_img read more

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CORRECTION-Tracker Flyers to compete for league championship

first_imgThe Fort St. John Tracker Flyers are three wins away from an NAMHL championship.Friday April 1, the Tracker Flyers will begin competing in the playoff finals, in a best-of-five series with the St. Albert Blues for the league championship.- Advertisement -As the regular season first placed team, the St. Albert Blues will have home ice advantage, hosting the Flyers for the first, second and third games of the finals.The Flyers will play host to the Blues for games four and five if necessary at the North Peace Arena. Game four will take place on Saturday, April 9 at 7:30 p.m. and game five on Sunday, April 10 at 12:30 p.m.The Tracker Flyers road to the finals has been extremely successful so far, as the team has yet to lose a post season game, sweeping all three series they have participated in.last_img read more

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Jed Welsh: It’s time to try some freshwater

first_imgIt looks like some of you anglers with boats moored in the Bay could spend an evening catching a load of squid and head for the Channel Islands or find a likely spot in the Bay. You all know where ever the squid are located there has to be silver giants near. With the local saltwater fishing being so poor you might check out the freshwater action. Reports from the lower Owens River say the fishing is finally picking up as the releases from the dam have leveled off but you still have work to find the fish. The trout move around very little in the cold water of winter. Reports are that this time of year 90 percent of the fish will congregate in 10 percent of the water. Rapala and Irvine Lake present a Red White and BLUE PRESIDENTS DAY TROUT TOURNAMENT. It will be held Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Two boats heading for Catalina turned around because of the conditions and made a feeble attempt at local fishing. One single boat made it to the sand dab hole and caught 2,720 “dabs” for 13 anglers. Commercial sources are revealing that there is lots of white sea bass activity at the Channel Islands and the word’s also out about the Santa Monica Bay teeming with live squid. Anglers can win all kinds of daily prizes from free boat rentals to rod and reel combos and lake passes. The daily tournament entry fee is $10. Per day. There are also daily cash jackpots for the single big trout weighed in. Irvine Lake will be stocked heavily with lunker trout. 976-TUNA Rod and Reel Club are putting on a Albacore Seminar with Captain Rick Hayes at the helm. Topics are “Albacore on the Iron”, “Private Boat Strategies”, “Where to Find Them”, “Bait Fishing” and “Albacore On the Plastics”. The seminar is Thursday, March 1 and starts at 7 p.m. at the National Sports Bar in Torrance, 3210 West Sepulveda Blvd, Torrance CA. Phone (310) 328-8426. The Fly Fishing Show will be held 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, March 3, and from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at the Pasadena Center, 300 E Green St., Pasadena. Admission is $14 per day or $24 for both days. The two-day event features seminars and demonstrations by some of the finest fly-fishermen, fly-casters, and fly-tyers in the nation. Contact The Fly Fishing Show at (800) 420-7582 Mike Goodwin of Lake Havasu City, AZ, caught two bass weighing 5 pounds, 13 ounces to win $125,000 in the $1 million Wal-Mart FLW Series National Guard Western Division tournament on Lake Havasu with a four-day catch of 15 bass weighing 37-13. The catch gave him the win by a solid 1-pound, 5-ounce margin over Mike Phua of Chino, CA, who caught a total of 18 bass weighing 36-8 and earned $48,841. Just a few days away, the beautiful, pink-meated Lightning Trout will make their 2007 debut at Santa Ana River Lakes and Corona Lake. The colorful trout will be stocked three consecutive weeks, and plants will include trophy-sized Lightning’s along with more plants of huge rainbows. All of the fish will come from Mt. Lassen Trout Farms in Red Bluff. The first Lightning Trout will arrive on Valentine’s Day night, Feb. 14, and they will be planted the following two Wednesday nights as well. If you’ve never caught these trout, you’ll fall in love with them during one of these three Lightning Trout weekends – Feb. 15-18, Feb. 22-25, and March 1-4. Don’t forget the Tundra & Lightning fishing tournament at Corona Lake Sunday, February 25. The Tournament offers free raffle tickets and thousands of dollars in prizes. The single big fish award wins an all expense, 6 day paid fishing trip, to Cabo Lucas for two. Fish tale In 1922 my adventures continued on Catalina Island as a 12- year-old kid patrolling and fishing the beachfront around Avalon. Bait for certain kinds of fishing was very difficult to get. The grown ups got most of it and left us kids with nothing. Once I saw a school of anchovies panicking in the water off Pebbly Beach as some very large white sea bass were on the attack. The anchovies were pushed to the shore and some were actually jumping up on the beachfront. I put one on a hook and threw it out and immediately got spooled by a 40-pound sea bass. After that we searched the beaches for the anchovy schools and once in a great while they showed up the same way and we always hooked up on nice white sea bass but it was far in between schools so naturally I got impatient. Looking for another fishing method I cut six inches off my mother’s kitchen broom, painted it dark blue and white (anchovy colors), screwed a treble hook into the end, walked the beach constantly casting and retrieving. We used to catch everything with that plug. We caught calico bass, barracuda, halibut, sea bass and we didn’t have to wait for the anchovies to jump up on the beach. Unfortunately, all the brooms in Avalon seemed to disappear. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img On Tuesday February 5, the Sportboat City of Redondo had two seabass hooked up and while one angler lost the bigger of the two, the other smaller one was landed and it weighed in at 63 pounds. The City also had limits on the sand bass and sculpin. But after that the saltwater local fishing took a major dive as the storm front did its damage and most sportboats at every landing were stuck in their slips. last_img read more

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Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgFRIDAY Fun After 40 Ballroom Dance Club will host ballroom dancing, 7:30-10 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12. Dance lessons: 6:30-7:30 p.m. Dance admission: $2 for club members, $4 for nonmembers. Dance lessons: $2. Call (661) 943-0210 or 267-5551. Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at Lancaster Presbyterian Church, 1661 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Call (661) 951-2988. Celebrate Recovery will meet, 7 p.m. at the Harvest Office and Ministry Center, 43209 10th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 942-2803. Speakers in the Wind Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Jack Knight at (661) 946-7166. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 10 a.m.-noon. Call Carmen Andersen at (661) 273-8122. MOPS (Mothers of Preschoolers) meets, 9:15 a.m.-noon the first and third Fridays of each month at Church of Christ, 1655 E. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Includes a hot breakfast buffet, discussion groups, featured speaker, craft and demonstrations. Children welcome. Cost: $5 for moms and $3 for kids. Call (661) 943-3162 or (661) 942-1638. Stress Management will meet, 1 p.m. at 43423 Division St., Suite 107, Lancaster. Call (661) 947-1595 or (661) 726-2850, Ext. 221. Speakers in the Wind Toastmaster Club 2867 will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call Joyce Hall at (661) 946-1181 or Barbara Linde at (661) 947-2537. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Celebrate Recovery, a biblically based 12-step recovery program, will meet, 7 p.m. at First Baptist Church, 44648 15th St. W. Call Pastor Pat Tanner at (661) 948-0855. The Lightkeepers, Spiritual Discussion Group, will meet, 7:30 p.m. at Center of Light, A.V. Church, 1030 West Ave. L-8, Lancaster. Call (661) 718-8731. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 and Ladies Auxiliary will serve steak or shrimp dinners, 5:30-8 p.m. at 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Takeout orders. Proceeds will go to community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Meditation class, 7-8:30 p.m. For location and information, call (661) 945-9832. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. in the multipurpose room on the mental health ward at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Ups and Downs, a support group for people who have been diagnosed with bipolar disorder or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Friendship Center, 43423 Division St. Suite 107, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. The Kaiser Permanente Grief Support Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. at the clinic offices, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Open to the community. Free. Call (661) 951-2988. The Weekenders, a social and recreational group for mental health consumers, will meet, 1-2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-1595. Al-Anon will have a 12-and-12 meeting at 10:30 a.m. at 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd. and a beginners meeting at 7 p.m. at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Pinochle Group for seniors, 6-9 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Oil painting class for seniors, 9-11 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Shop Talk Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Crazy Otto’s Diner. Call Stan Main at (661) 269-1424. Take Off Pounds Sensibly, Chapter 1681 will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. in Room 14 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-4459. Rosamond Moose Lodge, 1105 Sierra Highway, Rosamond, will serve dinner, 5-8 p.m. Cost: $4-$6. Bingo will start at 10 a.m., offered by the Knights of Columbus, 719 W. Ave. M, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Room 13, Lancaster. Call (661) 943-0595. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. SATURDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will take its monthly bus trip, to Laughlin, Nev. The trip includes food on the bus, plus a buffet and show at the Flamingo Hotel. Call (661) 267-2586. Leona Valley Sertoma Club meets, 8 a.m. the first and third Saturdays of every month at Jackie’s Restaurant, 40352 90th St. W., Leona Valley. Call (661) 270-0339. Low-cost Facilitated Parenting Group will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Seniors Lunch-Bingo Hour, noon-5 p.m. the fourth Saturday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Sponsored by Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity). Call Emerita Ross at (661) 723-7876 or Marie Cabrera at (661) 726-5309. Al-Anon will have a Spanish-speaking discussion meeting, 9 a.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite C-3, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353. Facilitated Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 2:30-4 p.m.; teens, 4:30-6 p.m., and adults, 10:30-noon or 12:30-2 p.m. at the Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Beginning yoga, 9-10 a.m. at Unity Church of Antelope Valley, 39149 8th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 273-3341. Women and Self-esteem support group meets in the Acton area. Call (661) 947-0839. Healing Heart support group will meet, 4-5:30 p.m. at the Salvation Army store, 45001 Beech Ave. in Lancaster. Call (661) 943-5830. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 9 a.m. at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church, 1737 E. Ave. R, Palmdale. Call Jane at (661) 945-4798. Women Midlife Transition Support Group for women over age 40 is facilitated by a professional psychotherapist. Call (661) 947-0839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 10-11:30 a.m. in Room 13 at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 724-1820. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org or www.sava-na.org. SUNDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a brunch, 12:30 p.m. at Vincent Hill Restaurant, 533 W. Sierra Highway, Acton. Call (661) 267-2586 by Friday. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30-10:30 p.m. Sunday at Lancaster Elks Lodge, 240 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Admission: $5 members, $7 nonmembers. Call (661) 949-9467 or 723-4891. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 1/2 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Can you help us find this dog’s owner?

first_imgThis friendly dog was found outside a house in Ards, Creeslough on Thursday morning. The ISPCA in Letterkenny have taken the dog in.The ISPCA are launching appeals to find the owners, however if no owner comes forward within a week, he will be put up for adoption. If you know who owns this dog please don’t hesitate to contact Donegal ISPCA on 086 6054943.Can you help us find this dog’s owner? was last modified: January 7th, 2017 by Elaine McCalligShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DOGdonegal ispcafoundmissinglast_img read more

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Lockyer urges top court to overrule 9th Circuit

first_imgWASHINGTON – Arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court, state Attorney General Bill Lockyer said Monday that trial judges deserve the benefit of the doubt in overseeing jury selection in their courtrooms. Lockyer argued in Rice v. Collins that the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals should not have overruled the trial judge’s decision that the prosecutor had nonracial reasons for dismissing two African-American women as potential jurors. Supreme Court justices, who did not immediately rule in the case, expressed concern about racial bias in jury selection, but several appeared to support Lockyer’s argument. They also questioned statements by Los Angeles Deputy Federal Public Defender Mark Drozdowski that the prosecutor presented a haphazard catalog of reasons for dismissing the two women that masked racial concerns. Justice Antonin Scalia said he could see the trial judge’s point of view. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals “It’s difficult to see how you can establish the trial court should have come out another way,” Scalia said. In the 1996 case in which Steven Collins was on trial for possession of rock cocaine, the prosecutor initially said gender may have played a role when she excused a single mother and a retired nurse with five grandchildren. After being told she could not use gender as a basis for dismissal, the prosecutor said her decision was due to youthfulness, lack of community ties and the demeanor of one of the women, including eye-rolling unseen by the judge. Noting that jury selection can be “an instinctive process more than a rational one,” Scalia said he was not concerned to see the prosecutor “flounder about” and offer several reasons when asked to explain her decision. He and other justices also defended the trial judge for giving the prosecutor the benefit of the doubt. Charles Hobson, an attorney for the Criminal Justice Legal Foundation in Sacramento, said he expects the Supreme Court to strike down the 9th Circuit decision. That, he said, would make it easier for prosecutors to defend cases alleging discrimination in jury selections. Lisa Friedman, (202) 662-8731 lisa.friedman@langnews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Dumb laws

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Laws are laws, and it’s important that people abide by them. But sometimes laws can be dumb. The municipal law in Burbank that requires Michael Scandiffio to cut down the big and long-lived hedge bordering his home in an affluent neighborhood is such a law. The hedge is in trouble not because it poses a public danger. It’s because 38 years ago the city leaders decided hedges taller than three feet didn’t look good and because someone – maybe a grumpy neighbor – turned Scandiffio in. Burbank, like every other city in the region, has serious problems with enforcement of housing, safety and building codes that imperil lives and property. It seems like the time and effort to police this particular hedge could be better used elsewhere. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Rugby, football – and a nation united

first_img9 July 2010 In 1994, when South Africa shed the shackles of apartheid, it did not mean the country was automatically set on a path of unity. Sport – starting with the 1995 Rugby World Cup, followed up by the 1996 African Nations Cup, and continuing with the 2010 Fifa World Cup – played and continues to play a major unifying role. During the apartheid years, sport was used as a major tool for resistance against the system of racial segregation, with South Africa being banned from competing on the international stage in most sporting codes – including cricket, rugby and football. These sanctions served the purpose of both highlighting the unjust system in the country at the time and of applying pressure on the National Party to end apartheid. As the first democratic president of South Africa, Mandela sought to work toward the goal of bringing together a once divided people and to lead South Africa on a path to success. In what for many seemed an insurmountable task, the Nobel Peace Prize winner did not just look to the corridors of government for a solution, but also to the playing field – a possible indication as to why South Africa has hosted so many major sporting events since.Rugby World Cup The first of many major sporting events hosted in the country was the IRB Rugby World Cup in 1995 – a tournament which saw South Africa lift the trophy at Ellis Park stadium in Johannesburg. South African cricket administrator Ali Bacher is no stranger to the importance of sport in South Africa’s history, having captained the South African cricket team in 1970 against Australia just before SA Cricket was kicked out of international participation. He also pushed for the breakdown of racial divisions in the sport, and shared a poignant moment with Mandela on the issue of sport and national unity. Bacher speaks about the mood leading up to the Rugby World Cup. This event saw calls for the removal of South Africa’s sporting emblem – the Springbok – due to its link with the predominantly white-dominated sports of the past. Mandela saw this argument as a chance to send a strong symbol to the white and Afrikaans population, many of whom feared reprisals from the apartheid years, by lending his support to their cause.Mandela’s wisdom “To give an indication of [Mandela’s] wisdom and insight, in 1995 – halfway through the Rugby World Cup – he came out publicly to support players wearing the Springbok emblem which, to many, represented a sporting code that only whites could play for in the apartheid era,” says Bacher. “A television crew came to me to ask about the response from South African cricket, and I said that we wanted a neutral emblem that would satisfy both white and black. “Soon after, Mandela invited me to lunch and he took me out onto the patio with two of my board members,” says Bacher. “He started to explain that he understood that among Afrikaans people, rugby and the [Springbok] emblem were very important.” Referring to the now famous post-match celebration in which Mandela come out onto the field wearing a South African rugby jersey with captain Francois Pienaar’s number on the back, Bacher says Mandela “told me he wore the rugby jersey and the emblem … because he wanted to thank [Afrikaans people] for their support for him as South Africa’s first black president.‘I see a difference now in 2010’ “In South Africa, the majority of the black population supported soccer, while the majority of whites supported rugby,” says Bacher. “Mandela rallied the black people to support rugby and united a country. The man that made it all happen was our revered icon, Nelson Mandela.” Reflecting on the 2010 FIFA World Cup™, Bacher says: “I see a difference now in 2010. At the grounds, thousands of whites have been dressed in Bafana Bafana clothing going out to support the national team – where previously it would be mainly black people. “I see black families and white families talking about the national team, taking pictures with each other. These are small things for people from overseas, but from a South African point of view this is very significant. “We have arrived at a state of true unification in this country.”1996 African Nations Cup Another sporting icon who has witnessed first-hand the power of sport in South Africa’s psyche is former Bafana Bafana football player, Mark Fish, who was part of the team that lifted the African Nations Cup trophy in 1996 at the very site where Soccer City stadium now stands. In another successful sporting tournament hosted by South Africa, the 1996 African Nations Cup was more than just a football tournament, as Nelson Mandela once again came out in the captain’s jersey to hand over the trophy to the victorious team. “In 1996 we represented a nation and saw what we are seeing now,” says Fish. “White people came to [the then] FNB stadium to support football and the nation. It was brilliant. Before, these people would know the rugby team, but after 1996 – with Mandela supporting the team – they knew who we were.‘We can build on this’ “It was the highlight of my football career – not winning the trophy, but seeing how people came together and united behind Bafana Bafana,” says Fish. “That’s why I think we ended up winning the tournament. The way the country got behind us was absolutely phenomenal.” Fish believes the 2010 Fifa World Cup has also had a dramatic effect on the nation. “We have seen a nation get behind Bafana; people are talking about football. The challenge for us as a nation and a footballing nation is to keep the standard that we have now reached,” says Fish. “We can build on this if we continue to work together as a nation.” Source: 2010 Fifa World Cup South Africa Organising Committeelast_img read more

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Change of address… and attitude

first_imgTotal South Africa general manager of sales and marketing Qetello Zeka addresses the community of Katlegong. Community leader Thabo Molebatsi reflects on the process. A view from the front of one of the homes of the 18 relocated families. A water tank and vegetable garden can be seen to the left. Frans Lombard and Thabo Molebatsi unveil a plaque at the entrance to the settlement. The community sings the national anthem at the end of the proceedings.(Images: Valencia Talane)MEDIA CONTACTS• Jessica Chadinha Jenny Newman PR+27 11 506 7357• Andiswa GabadaCommunications coordinator: TotalSouth Africa+27 11 778 2070Valencia TalaneIn June 2012, the South African National Roads Association Limited (Sanral) embarked on a project to widen the N4 freeway between Rustenburg and Brits in the North West province. For this stretch of road, the development included the construction of a new carriageway as well as an off-ramp adjacent to the Total Petroport Magalies, a toll plaza on the N4.For the community of Katlegong in the Bapong area of Modderspruit, this would bring long-term changes they had not expected. Eighteen families would have to be moved from the land they had previously occupied, close to the existing highway, to make way for the changes. This task would not be without its challenges, both emotional and financial.The completed effort was celebrated on 23 October by the community, together with Fuelarama, a company that has operated Petroport since 1995, and its franchisor, fuel giant Total South Africa.In order for these families to retain access to the plaza, which has a Bonjour convenience shop and a Steers fast food outlet, they would have to be moved to make way for the development.“Telling someone that you’re going to make changes that affect their home is always an emotional issue,” said Fuelarama director Frans Lombard. “We obviously had to be sensitive in our approach.”Four months of hard workSanral approached Fuelarama in June, giving them a September deadline to either complete the relocation project or cut access to their business for the settlement adjacent to Katlegong. But before the physical structures could be replicated on a new piece of land, negotiations with the whole community, not just the affected families, would have to start to eliminate issues of mistrust for either party.Thabo Molebatsi, a former forecourt manager at Petroport, seemed the most obvious choice to play the role of middleman, because he’s also the chairperson of Katlegong’s Communal Property Association. He was willing to act as the liaison between Fuelarama and the community to help the two parties to come to a suitable agreement on the relocation terms. Soon enough, however, he would realise the legislative and logistical requirements of a project of this magnitude.“There was a sense of mistrust from the community, and when the initial negotiations started, demands became less and less reasonable as time went on, and there were ultimatums, ” said Molebatsi.It was at the point of a stalemate that the Department of Land Affairs was brought in to help restore either side’s faith in the process, added the community leader.Because the land in question is privately owned and was handed back to the community as part of the government’s ongoing land redistribution programme in 1999, it was imperative that the department facilitate the negotiations, while also providing support on the legislative obligations of either party.“The community needed to know that a deal like this would not come their way again,” said Molebatsi. “Even the people from Land Affairs made that clear.”Referring to South Africa’s dark history of forced relocations of black and coloured families, mainly in the 1950s and 1960s, Molebatsi said his community’s scepticism was not unfounded.“At some point I was labelled a sell-out by some elements within the community, some of whom questioned my loyalty, and that hurt because my loyalty will always be to my community as their leader.”Sustainability is keyTotal’s involvement, besides being Fuelarama’s franchisor, was to help make the project more than just about moving people from point A to B, said general manager of sales and marketing for the fuel conglomerate, Qetello Zeka.“With all our franchisees, we seek to make their CSI projects sustainable, with an entrepreneurial focus for the communities they serve,” she said. “So when Fuelarama approached us to get involved in this, our mandate was to find out what value we could add to the relocation.”A vegetable garden and several fruit trees – a very popular feature in the agriculture-orientated Magalies area – were planted, while a borehole through which running tap water is provided, was dug at the centre of the new settlement.Although the homes are of corrugated iron, a fact that Lombard said Fuelarama could not improve on because of a limited budget, the stands are bigger and are fenced, which was not the case with the previous stands. For two of the families that had already built brick structures, the company restored these to their previous state.“Some of these homes did not even have flooring at the old location,” said Lombard, “and it humbles me as a human being to be able to provide something as simple as concrete flooring for each and every one of them.“When they found out that they would get newly-paved floors – something I take for granted in my own perfectly tiled home – they were very grateful.”As for the vegetable garden and the trees, Lombard added, the aim was to add a viable element of ownership and responsibility. A small play area with swings was also added for the young children in the community.Connecting with the communityAfter four months of negotiations with the community over the project, Lombard said they have now forged a relationship with them that they had not envisaged, one that was cultivated amid weeks of heated meetings and the temptation to give up.“Today, even the children are used to seeing our faces here, and people know us by name.”Molebatsi agreed: “We went from a place of animosity and negativity to a place where everyone realises how, by negotiating what works best for everyone, we can get something out.”“We named the project ‘Selosesha’, which means ‘something new’ to symbolise that.”Sedibeng Municipality councillor Peter Makgabo gave credit to the community for their patience, joking that everyone involved virtually qualifies as a lawyer after this process because they had to be thorough.“We all learned a lot from the process, and the back and forth emails and countless meetings were well worth it.”The carriageway and off-ramp development is expected to be completed in March 2013.last_img read more

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