Trump says unproven coronavirus drugs could be ‘gift from God’

first_imgUS President Donald Trump on Monday said antimalarial drugs that are under investigation to treat the new coronavirus could be a “gift from God” despite scientists warning against the dangers of overhyping unproven medicines.Trump announced last week his administration was working to dramatically expand access to hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine, a related compound, following promising early studies in France and China that found the drugs helped patients suffering from the COVID-19 illness.Many scientists including Anthony Fauci, the United States’ leading infectious disease expert, have urged the public to remain cautious until larger clinical trials validate the smaller studies. “I saw it sitting on the back shelf and thought, ‘Hey, isn’t that the stuff they’re talking about on TV?'” NBC quoted the unnamed woman as saying.Banner Health, a non-profit health care provider based in Phoenix, said on its website that “a man has died and his wife is under critical care after the couple, both in their 60s, ingested chloroquine phosphate, an additive commonly used at aquariums to clean fish tanks.”Banner Health warned against self-medicating to treat or prevent the COVID-19 illness.Trump has been criticized by some in the scientific community for overhyping the drugs — which could create shortages for Americans who need them to treat lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, diseases for which they are approved.New York is set to begin a clinical trial on Tuesday that would treat patients with hydroxychloroquine taken together with azithromycin, an antibiotic used to clear secondary bacterial infections. Separately, Vice President Mike Pence announced that self-administered nasal swab tests for the illness would be made available this week, thus reducing part of the burden on the overstretched health care system.At present, the test is administered by health care workers wearing personal protective gear, which is in short supply.The US has almost 44,000 cases and 560 deaths, according to a tracker maintained by Johns Hopkins University.Topics : But Trump demonstrated no such restraint at a White House press briefing on Monday.”The hydroxychloroquine and the Z-Pak, I think as a combination probably is looking very, very good,” he said.”There’s a real chance that it could have a tremendous impact, it would be a gift from God, if that worked it would be a big game changer,” he added, quoting the example of a patient who was ill but recovered after taking the drug.NBC reported that a woman in Arizona, who heard Trump talk about chloroquine, ended up in hospital and her husband died after they took a form of chloroquine she had used to treat her koi fish.last_img read more

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Fears of new COVID-19 cluster at North Sumatra University as rector tests positive

first_imgThe rector of the North Sumatra University (USU) in Medan, Runtung Sitepu, along with deputy rector Rosmayati and the university’s board of trustees member Darma Bakti have tested positive for COVID-19, local authorities confirmed on Sunday. “There are three USU executives who tested positive for COVID-19. To contain the spread of the virus, we urge all those who have been in close contact with them within the last 14 days to take a swab test at the USU hospital or other swab test centers located in North Sumatra,” USU hospital director Syah Mirsya Wali said on Sunday.The three confirmed cases in USU have raised concerns of a new COVID-19 cluster in the region as the campus remains open, with computer-based exams (UTBK) as part of the annual state university entrance test (SBMPTN) set to continue until the end of the month with as many as 35,794 participants. USU spokesperson Elvi Sumanti said the matter was “still being coordinated with the executive board,” adding that all campus activities would continue normally.“The rector tested positive, without showing any symptoms, based on the independent swab test that he took,” she told The Jakarta Post. Runtung himself confirmed his health status to the press via phone on Sunday. “I am fine and I don’t feel like I am sick,” he said.He also urged anyone who had been in close contact with him to take a COVID-19 swab test immediately. “I don’t want to cover it [positive COVID-19 result] up, that is why I am asking this matter to be published.”Meanwhile, North Sumatra COVID-19 task force spokesperson Aris Yudhariansyah called on USU to do comprehensive tracing and implement strict health protocols to curb the spread of the virus in one of the biggest and most prestigious universities in the region. According to the official government count, North Sumatra has 2,323 confirmed COVID-19 cases, with 123 deaths as of Sunday.(trn)Topics :last_img read more

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Child abuse protection systems failing NZ kids – judge

first_imgONE News 16 June 2013Damning new figures released to ONE News reveal efforts to curb child abuse are failing. Rates of child abuse have risen by 32% in the last five years, with instances happening to children who are already in the care of the state. A district judge has now spoken out, saying it is time for a new approach. Figures show more than 21,000 New Zealand children were victims of child abuse last year alone. Around one-fifth of them (4000) were taken from their families and put into Child, Youth and Family care homes. But it was in these supposedly ‘safe homes’ that at least 23 vulnerable children were further abused.http://tvnz.co.nz/national-news/child-abuse-protection-systems-failing-nz-kids-judge-5466483last_img

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Kids of Single Parents More Likely to Witness Domestic Violence

first_imgFamily Studies 5 January 2015Many studies have found that young people raised in single-parent families show more achievement and behavior problems than those who grow up with both their biological parents. Family sociologists often attribute these developmental problems to the meager financial resources that single parents command, and the less adequate supervision they can exercise over their offspring. But research has also shown that childhood disturbances are linked to conflict between parents, especially when the conflict is intense or prolonged. My analysis of recent national survey data here shows that children of divorced and never-married parents are far more likely to have been exposed to domestic violence than children in married two-parent families.In the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children’s Health, conducted by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics, parents of 95,677 children aged 17 and under were asked whether their child had ever seen or heard “any parents, guardians, or any other adults in the home slap, hit, kick, punch, or beat each other up.” Among children living with both married biological parents, the rate of exposure to family violence was relatively low: for every 1,000 children in intact families, 19 had witnessed one or more violent struggles between parents or other household members. By comparison, among children living with a divorced or separated mother, the rate of witnessing domestic violence was seven times higher: 144 children per 1,000 had had one or more such experiences. (See Figure 1.) These comparisons are adjusted for differences across groups in the age, sex, and race/ethnicity of the child, family income and poverty status, and the parent’s education level.One might suppose that women who had never married would be less likely to get into violent arguments with the fathers of their children than separated or divorced mothers. Yet the rate of witnessing domestic violence among children living with never-married mothers was also elevated. It was 116 per 1,000, six times higher than the rate for children in intact families. (Some of these fights involved subsequent partners or boyfriends of the mother, rather than the father of the child.) Even children living with both biological parents who were cohabiting—rather than married—had more than double the risk of domestic violence exposure as those with married birth parents: 45 out of 1,000 of these children had witnessed family fights that became physical. Note also that a child’s family structure was a better predictor of witnessing family violence than was her parents’ education, family income, poverty status, or race.Experiencing family violence is stressful for children, undercuts their respect and admiration for parents who engage in abusive behavior, and is associated with increased rates of emotional and behavioral problems at home and in school. For example, among children of never-married mothers who had witnessed family violence, 58 percent had conduct or academic problems at school requiring parental contact. The rate of school behavior problems for those who had not been exposed to family fights was significantly lower, though still fairly high (36 percent). Likewise, among children of divorced or separated mothers, nearly half of those exposed to family violence—48 percent—had had conduct or academic problems at school. Even among the small number of children in intact families who had witnessed family violence, just over half—51 percent—presented problems at school. This was twice the rate of school problems among students from intact families who had not witnessed domestic violence. (See Figure 2.) These figures are also adjusted for differences across groups in age, sex, and race/ethnicity of children, family income and poverty, and parent education levels. Children experiencing domestic violence were also more likely to have repeated a grade in school and to have received psychological counseling for emotional or behavioral problems. This was true in intact as well as disrupted families.http://family-studies.org/children-in-single-parent-families-are-more-likely-to-witness-domestic-violence/last_img read more

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Passi City ‘drug-cleared’

first_img* no clandestine drug laboratory, drugwarehouse, clandestine chemical warehouse or marijuana cultivation site ILOILO – Today, the component city ofPassi would be formally declared as “drug-cleared.” The regional oversight committee onthe campaign against illegal drugs would make the formal declaration. * no drug pusher, user, protector orfinancier The committee is composed of theDepartment of Health, Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency, Philippine NationalPolice, and Department of Interior and Local Government. “Gin-trabahonaton ang mga persons who used drugs in ourbarangays. Ginpa-undergocommunity-based rehabilitation in four to six weeks,” said Palmares. The city met all the parameters forsuch status set by the Dangerous Drugs Board, said Mayor Stephen Palmares. Section 6 of Dangerous Drugs BoardRegulation No. 3, Series of 2017 set the following parameters:center_img * no available illegal drugs * no drug den; and * no drug transit / transshipmentactivity Making Passi City drug-free was on topof his agenda when he became the mayor, said Palmares. Passi is a 4th class city. Accordingto the 2015 census, it has a population of 80,544 people in 51 barangays. Considered to be one of the oldestSpanish settlements in Iloilo (it was organized as a pueblo or communitysettlement of natives in 1766, Passi became a component city of Iloilo in1998./PNlast_img read more

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Trojans-A 8th Grade Basketball Team Victorious

first_imgThe 8th Grade “A” Sunman-Dearborn Trojans defeated Jac-Cen-Del last night by a score of 47-15.Scoring by quarters was SDMS 10-8, halftime was SDMS 19-9, 3rd quarter was 37-13, with the final at 47-15.Total team effort with 10/11 players scoring. Next game is next Tuesday at home vs. South Dearborn.Courtesy of Trojans Coach Thomas Meyer.last_img

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Murder investigation underway in Dearborn County

first_imgDearborn County, In. — Indiana State Police detectives are conducting a homicide investigation in the Lawrenceburg area.Officials say the body of Thomas Biedenharn, 73, was found Monday around 2:15 p.m. at a residence on Highridge Court in the Hidden Valley Subdivision. Evidence at the scene suggests foul play was involved.An autopsy has determined his death was a homicide. No arrests have been made.Confidential information can be left with the Indiana State Police Criminal Investigative Division by calling 812-689-5000. The Dearborn County Sheriff’s Department and the Dearborn-Switzerland County prosecutor’s office are also assisting.last_img

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Diana Marie Davis, 58

first_imgDiana Marie Davis, 58, Greensburg, passed away with her family by her side on Monday, July 16, 2018. A wife, devoted mother and grandmother, and trusted friend. The joy of her life was her children and grandchildren. Born, May 31, 1960 in Greensburg, Indiana, she was the daughter of Vernon and Mary Ann (Greiwe) Wilmer.  Diana was a 1978 graduate of Greensburg Community High School.  She worked nearly 20 years as the parish secretary at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Greensburg and before that, she served as deputy clerk at the Decatur County Courthouse. She was married to John B. Davis on September 27, 1980, and he survives. She is also survived by her parents; three sons, Bruce Davis and Vess Miller, Indianapolis, Matthew (Taylor) Davis, Shelbyville, Eric (Erica) Davis, W. Harrison; four sisters, Rita (Dave) Geis, Greensburg, Shirley (Jack) Rich, Greensburg, Karen (Tom) White, Batesville, Brenda (Keith) Clark, Franklin; one brother, Carl (Jill) Wilmer, Greensburg; five grandchildren, Lennon Davis, Nicholas Davis, Tanner Davis, Keira Davis, and Addlyn Vanderpohl; several nieces and nephews. Family and friends will gather at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 24th at the St. Mary’s Catholic Church to pray the rosary.  Visitation will follow until 8:00 p.m. at the church.   The family will also receive friends from 9:00 a.m. until the funeral mass at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 25, 2018 at the St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Greensburg with Rev. John Meyer officiating. Memorials may be made to the St. Mary’s Catholic Church Building Fund, the St. Mary’s School, or to the Sarcoma Foundation of America (curesarcoma.org). Online condolences can be made to the family at www.popfuneralhome.comlast_img read more

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WHO reports record daily rise in coronavirus cases

first_imgThe World Health Organization (WHO) has recorded a record one-day rise in the number of new coronavirus infections, with 307,930 reported over 24 hours.The agency said that deaths rose by more than 5,500, bringing the global total to 917,417.The biggest increases in infections were reported in India, the US and Brazil. Other countries that have seen a resurgence of the virus include Peru, Israel, South Korea and Australia.On Sunday, police in the Australian state of Victoria arrested more than 70 protesters for flouting stay-at-home orders. About 250 people had attended the protest in the city of Melbourne, which was promoted by social media groups sharing conspiracy theories about the pandemic.Also Read  Relief for families as MOH revises Covid-19 burial protocolsVictoria has been the epicentre of Australia’s outbreak, accounting for 75% of cases and 90% of deaths.Neighbouring New Zealand is to lift coronavirus restrictions – apart from in the largest city of Auckland – on 21 September, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced on Monday.The country has had great success containing coronavirus but restrictions were imposed on Auckland last month after a number of new infections were identified.Israel, meanwhile, is to impose a new nationwide lockdown as coronavirus cases there continue to rise. Tough restrictions will come into effect on Friday – Jewish new year – and will last at least three weeks, authorities said.Israel has seen more than 153,000 confirmed infections and 1,108 deaths from Covid-19, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University. The previous one-day record for new cases was on 6 September when the WHO reported 306,857 new infections.Where are cases rising most steeply?According to the WHO, India reported 94,372 new cases on Sunday, followed by the US with 45,523 and Brazil with 43,718.More than 1,000 new deaths were recorded in the US and India while Brazil said 874 people had died from Covid-19 related illness in the past 24 hours.Also Read  KUPPET calls on parents to prepare for early reopeningIndia has the second largest number of confirmed cases in the world, behind the US. Last week it reported nearly two million Covid-19 cases in August, the highest monthly tally in the world since the pandemic began.began.The country saw an average of 64,000 cases per day – an 84% hike from average daily cases in July, according to official data. The death toll has topped 1,000 every day since the beginning of September.Brazil has recorded more than four million cases, the third highest in the world. It has the highest number of deaths in Latin America, with about 131,000 so far.The US has recorded almost a quarter of the world’s total number of coronavirus cases – more than six million. It saw an increase in the number of daily cases in July, but the numbers have fallen since then.Also Read  Teachers to report back to school on MondayThe US has the world’s highest recorded death toll from Covid-19, with more than 194,000 fatalities.What’s the situation elsewhere?Countries across Europe are recording a rising number of daily cases amid fears of a resurgence of the virus.Local lockdowns have been imposed in the worst-affected regions, and there have been renewed appeals for people to wear face coverings and follow social distancing rules.center_img Worldwide there have been more than 28 million confirmed cases, half of which have been in the Americas.Get breaking news on your Mobile as-it-happens. SMS ‘NEWS’ to 20153last_img read more

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Cameron to undergo hernia surgery

first_img “It’s been troubling him for a while, so the time has come for an operation,” assistant manager Mark Bowen told The Sentinel. “He started feeling it last season, then obviously went to the World Cup and came back to us still feeling a bit sore. “These things tend to manifest themselves over a period of months and now the time has come, but it’s difficult to say how long we will lose him for.” Odemwingie, who has been omitted from Stoke’s 25-man squad submitted to the Premier League for the first half of the campaign because of the length of his lay-off, has yet to start rehabilitation but Bowen remains optimistic. “The operation seems to have gone well, which is obviously great news and it always helps a recovery when you’ve got someone of Peter’s great spirits,” he added. There was more positive news on midfielder Stephen Ireland, who returned to training on Tuesday after a rib injury sustained on August 22. “He (Ireland) came through training okay and if he isn’t ready for this weekend, then I’m sure he’ll be banging on the door for the weekend after,” said Bowen. The United States international has made just one appearance this season, in the Capital One Cup victory over Portsmouth, but was forced off with the long-standing injury before half-time. Cameron’s absence is the second injury blow to hit the Potters after forward Peter Odemwingie had an operation on damaged knee ligaments. Stoke utility player Geoff Cameron is to undergo surgery to fix a troublesome hernia problem. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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