What We Mean by Software-Defined Storage

first_imgIt’s day two of EMC World 2013 in Las Vegas. Everybody here is talking about or asking about software-defined storage. Let me give you a couple of analogies to help you understand what we mean by software-defined storage and what we at EMC are doing. There are two main components to keep in mind.Virtualize Everything, Compromise NothingIn my living room at home, I have a half-dozen control devices for my TV, my set top box for streaming Internet content to my TV, a DVR, a video game that my kids use more than I do, a DVD player, and an amplifier. There is nothing more annoying than not being able to watch a program because my kid has hidden the remote. I’d rather not have to search for it and fiddle with it. I’d rather just watch the program. It’s the same in the data center. You need dedicated operators for different infrastructures. And it’s a real pain.To control the devices in your living room, or to control the different devices in your data center, you need a common way of doing it. It’s more efficient. The folks in the data center can be way more productive. And it’s more reliable, because you tend to do things in a standard way.So if the universal remote control is what controls your home entertainment devices in your living room, software-defined storage controls the physical arrays in your data center. That’s the first part of what we are doing with software-defined storage.But that’s only half of it. In addition to providing a new model for storage management, software-defined storage also provides a new architecture for new kinds of workloads. And this is where the story really gets interesting.To continue the home entertainment analogy, a lot of the programming that was created for your traditional television set really didn’t produce a lot of high demands. Not all that long ago, you could only view about 525 lines or so of a TV picture if you were in the U.S., or 625 lines, I believe, if you were in Europe. But, either way, there really wasn’t any killer content to make TV come more alive.Over time, the entertainment industry went a long way to make movies and programming look phenomenal. But the regular, traditional TV just wouldn’t do it justice. So, in order to view the new movies and programming in all its glory, we needed something to interpret that content type. Without an HDTV and an HD DVR, you just didn’t get the full experience. So, people went out and got the wide screen, HDTV to watch the Super Bowl. And they kept the smaller TV they had in the kitchen for convenience. Different devices for different types of content.We see the same thing happening in data centers. A lot of new applications are being built in a different way, and we need new capabilities to interpret the new content types. So think of software-defined storage as enriching the underlying storage arrays to interpret these new content types that many of these new applications will be building.Now, traditional applications are not going away. Industry analysts estimate that traditional workloads will expand by 70% between 2012-2016. These workloads are typically block and file workloads. They require a high degree of transactional consistency. And a lot of the resiliency is built into the hardware itself. But we think the real opportunity going forward is going to be in next-generation cloud applications. These are a relatively small number of apps today, but they are growing explosively — ten times faster than traditional workloads! Typically, they are not going to require a block or file storage infrastructure. Object storage is what they are going to demand.We think we have solved many of these challenges with a product we call EMC ViPR. It is not just a point product. It is a platform for software-defined storage – both a new model for storage management, as well as the data services that provide a new architecture for new kinds of workloads. To learn more about it, see yesterday’s post, What is Software-Defined Storage?, by my colleague Amitabh Srivastava, head of EMC’s Advanced Storage Division.last_img read more

Read More →

Building a Better Cloud Starts with Getting the Best People

first_imgAs we close in on the end of our fiscal year, it’s amazing to see how much success we’ve had on the Dell Technologies Cloud team in our inaugural year. This isn’t a blog post to pat ourselves on the back or take the victory lap; it’s an acknowledgement that we still have a long way to go to achieve our goals, and that means growing the team.In this new decade, what organizations require from their cloud solutions partners has substantially changed. No one is clamoring for yet another public cloud vendor to further splinter things. No, what organizations need is a partner who can drive consistency across these disparate environments. And who better than Dell Technologies, a leader not only in infrastructure solutions, but also virtualization and cloud software, with a strong commitment to building the solutions that organizations have come to rely on so heavily.With that in mind, we launched Dell Technologies Cloud, the first set of solutions that show the path forward for Dell Technologies: Embracing Cloud Operating Models everywhere. This direction permeates every aspect of our business from engineering, to sales, to marketing. And because of this we are actively expanding our team, looking for the best and the brightest to join us on this rocketship.Here is why you should believe in us, and why this is a great organization to come into:Market Acceptance – You might be saying, “why should I select Dell Technologies versus one of the hyperscalers?” The truth is we are one of the largest and most trusted infrastructure and software companies in the world, and our launch of Dell Technologies Cloud has been praised by analysts and customers alike.Ability to Make an Impact – Since the solution is relatively new to market and we’re rapidly transforming to meet new markets and new customers’ needs across the board, we have a startup-like culture, backed with the investments only the largest companies can make.Smart and Pragmatic Leadership – We enter spaces with an obvious market need and where we hold a competitive advantage, versus getting into protracted and messy battles where either side’s success looks more like mutually assured destruction. Because of this, even during challenging economic conditions we’ve executed well and taken share.Strong Culture – I’ve spent time in many different organizations but Dell’s commitment to work/life balance and ability to foster a collaborative “one team” culture is truly unique. I can’t stress enough how amazing it is to be able to ask for help and see folks willing to support as opposed to having them say “that’s not in my KPIs.”Career Trajectory – From what I’ve observed in my almost three years here, and looking at this team specifically, we’re in a high growth area that can lead to great career growth. From my own experience I would say it’s been the most I’ve ever been rewarded for the work I’ve done.Come join us! Take on the challenge of educating an entire market that the next decade must deliver consistent experiences across all the clouds. It’s a great company to work for.Please visit the Dell Technologies career site and search for “cloud” jobs there. We have many openings including Product Marketing, Sales Enablement, Engineering, and Product Management roles that we’re actively filling.last_img read more

Read More →

Supercharging AI and HPC Engines with Dell Technologies and NVIDIA

first_img Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 3:17Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -3:17 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsdefault, selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:54Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVERemaining Time -1:54 Playback Rate1ChaptersChaptersdescriptions off, selectedDescriptionssubtitles off, selectedSubtitlescaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedCaptionsen (Main), selectedAudio TrackFullscreenThis is a modal window.Caption Settings DialogBeginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsDefaultsDoneClose Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Dell Technologies and NVIDIA deliver unprecedented acceleration and flexibility for AI, data analytics and HPC to tackle some of the world’s toughest computing challenges.Dell Technologies has long been on the forefront of innovation when it comes to artificial intelligence and high performance computing, and in many cases NVIDIA has been right there with us.This close relationship of two global technology leaders got started well before 2013, when Dell and NVIDIA worked together to advance the concept of a dense GPU platform, which would emerge in the Dell EMC PowerEdge server family. This concept came to market in 2014, when Dell introduced the industry’s first dense 1U four-GPU platform — the Dell EMC PowerEdge C4130 server.This legacy of innovation continued in the days that followed, and in 2016 Dell Technologies became the first OEM to support NVIDIA SXM2 technology. This technology, which is used in the NVIDIA Tesla V100 SXM2 GPU, enables high-speed, direct GPU-to-GPU communication via the NVIDIA NVLink interconnect.The following year, in 2017, Dell Technologies became the first vendor to support the NVIDIA Volta V100 GPU in a unique, balanced CPU-to-GPU dense platform — the Dell EMC PowerEdge C4140 server. This accelerator-optimized, high-density server is built to meet the demands of cognitive computing workloads in a 1U server format that supports four GPUs.In the years since, we have built on our strategic partnership to bring new Dell EMC Ready Solutions for AI to market. These offerings include Deep Learning with NVIDIA, a Dell EMC Ready Solution that provides a GPU‑optimized solution stack that helps organizations shave valuable time from deep learning projects. The Deep Learning with NVIDIA solution is built around NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs.Success storiesOver the years, the team of Dell Technologies and NVIDIA has had great success with our common customer base. Here’s a small sample of our mutual successes:We worked closely on a major expansion of the HPC5 supercomputer at Eni, an Italy-based integrated energy company. This system is based on 1,820 Dell EMC PowerEdge C4140 servers, each with four NVIDIA V100 Tensor Core GPUs and two 2nd Generation Intel® Xeon® Scalable processors. With the performance of the HPC5 supercomputer, Eni’s scientists and engineers can use extremely sophisticated in-house algorithms to process subsoil data. We worked in collaboration with the Research Computing Service at the University of Cambridge to develop the Wilkes2 supercomputer, which debuted in 2017 as a TOP500 system and the largest GPU-enabled supercomputer for academic research in the UK. This system is based on Dell EMC PowerEdge servers, each with four NVIDIA GPUs. It supports a wide-range of compute- and data-intensive research, from aeronautical turbulence and automotive combustion simulations to materials modeling and medical applications.center_img We collaborated on the development of one of Canada’s most powerful academic supercomputers, the Super Cedar system at Simon Fraser University. This TOP500 system, launched in 2017, revs up scientific studies with the power of 584 NVIDIA GPUs. It is helping thousands of researchers from British Columbia and across Canada collect, analyze, share and store immense volumes of data. Market leadershipIn developing products and solutions with NVIDIA, Dell Technologies builds on a broad and deep product portfolio that spans from best-in-class servers with the latest processing architectures to leading-edge storage and networking systems, all backed by expert services.In a sign of this leadership, Dell Technologies took the top spot in both server revenue and shipments in 2019, with 20.5 percent market share and 16.3 percent market share, respectively, according to Gartner. Meanwhile, Dell Technologies  maintains “a commanding market share lead” in high-performance storage, according to a 2019 report from Intersect360 Research. The firm noted that Dell Technologies also has the No. 1 revenue share position for storage for HPC applications and  is the overall leader in total HPC solutions revenue. Looking aheadToday, we’re excited about our opportunities to support the new NVIDIA A100 Tensor Core GPU in systems, solutions and services that accelerate workloads, from edge to core to cloud, just as we support other NVIDIA GPU accelerators and technologies in a wide range of our offerings.This new GPU is designed to help users tackle some of the world’s toughest computing challenges. It delivers unprecedented acceleration at every scale for AI, data analytics and HPC. As the engine of the NVIDIA data center platform, A100 can efficiently scale up to thousands of GPUs, or it can be partitioned into isolated GPU instances to accelerate workloads of all sizes.NVIDIA reports that the A100 accelerates major deep learning frameworks and more than 700 HPC applications — and that’s one of the reasons why we at Dell Technologies are excited to incorporate this GPU in our portfolio for HPC, AI and data analytics.To learn moreFor a look at how the San Diego Supercomputer Center is capitalizing on NVIDIA GPUs in its new Expanse supercomputer from Dell Technologies, see the case study “Architecting for Mixed Workloads at Massive Scale.”last_img read more

Read More →

Quarter dogs’ return for midterms week

first_imgSophomore John Hough remembers a time when The Huddle always sold hot dogs for a quarter after midnight. Those times are over, but this week, thanks to the Student Union Board, he can relive them. At the beginning of this school year, The Huddle raised the price of these midnight hot dogs, nicknamed “quarter dogs,” from 25 cents to 33 cents. “There was a lot of drama about it [the price change], and it was something students seemed to care about,” junior Kevin DeLaMontaigne said. Student Union Board (SUB) services programmers DeLaMontaigne and sophomore Jenny Yi arranged to subsidize hot dog prices from Sunday through Thursday and provide students such as Hough an opportunity to pay only one quarter for “quarter dogs” during midterms week. Yi said it was relatively easy to provide this service; it required approval from Huddle Management and a commitment on the part of SUB to pay the difference in price for all hot dogs sold. “We figured there’d be lots of students in LaFortune this week, and this would brighten up their days and give them something to look forward to,” Yi said. DeLaMontaigne said he hoped that by specifically choosing a week when many students have midterm exams, the low-priced hot dogs might serve as a “stress reliever.” Both Yi and DeLaMontaigne were optimistic about the week-long event, and hope to repeat it sometime in the future. When and if this would occur depends in large part on student response. “If people are into it and if the number of hot dogs sold goes up, then it shows people like it,” DeLaMontaigne said. Hough is supportive of the subsidy and was disappointed when the price was raised, he said. He purchased the hot dogs approximately twice per week last year, but Sunday was his first time back after the price increase. Another student taking advantage of the reduced price, sophomore Jessie Bretl, echoed Hough’s sentiments. “A quarter is easy, but who has 33 cents in their pocket?” said Bretl. Adam Hill, The Huddle manager on duty Sunday night, said the price decrease did not seem to yield a greater number of hot dog purchases Sunday night. “The volume is about the same as any other night. There doesn’t seem to be a real difference,” Hill said.last_img read more

Read More →

Return to Grace

first_imgIn the midst of a surprising undefeated football season and Notre Dame’s rise to the No. 1 spot atop the national college football polls this weekend, hopeful Irish fans continue to draw parallels between 2012 and 1988, the last time the team won a national championship. But when it comes to lighting the No. 1 sign atop Grace Hall, that parallel is not merely speculative. Design professor Robert Sedlack was a resident assistant in Grace during his senior year and the 1988 football season, and he played a crucial role in making the Irish’s No. 1 ranking known to all of campus. “It just so happened that I was an RA on the 11th floor of Grace and had the keys to the penthouse,” he said. “So lighting the sign fell on my to-do list, and I had to go up in the morning and the evening to turn it off and on each day.” Sedlack began his lighting duties after the then-No. 2 Irish jumped ahead of then-No. 1 UCLA following a 22-7 victory against Navy and the Bruins’ upset loss to Washington State. He said he and his friends began preparing to celebrate that change shortly after it happened. “Once it looked like we were going to achieve that No. 1 ranking, some buddies of mine built the sign out on the roof of Grace,” Sedlack said. They took a page out of the book of Fr. Gerry Lardner, Grace Hall’s rector at the time and a Notre Dame graduate student during the team’s 1973 championship season. The tradition of the No. 1 sign began after that season, when it was initially placed outside Moreau Seminary, University Architect Doug Marsh said. “Fr. Gerry was a great rector and we had a good group of RAs that year, so he wanted to kind of redo [the sign] and so the guys rebuilt it,” Sedlack said. But the relighting of the sign came as something of a surprise after the first three mediocre seasons Sedlack and his 1989 classmates experienced. “Our freshman year was so awful … a guy once offered my roommate $10 for a pair of tickets he tried to sell for the last game of the season,” Sedlack said. “You fast forward to senior year, and tickets for the Miami-Notre Dame game at home were going for $1,000 each.” Between his freshman and senior years, Sedlack saw receiver Tim Brown win the Heisman Trophy his junior year and leave the team somewhat in limbo when he graduated. “I think we thought we’d be OK [without Brown], but I don’t think anybody thought we’d be the best in the country,” Sedlack said. “You could make the argument that my classmates and I were at Notre Dame during the best years for Notre Dame football,” he said. “Our claim is that you can’t understand how incredible it is to win a national championship having not had a crappy freshman year.” Sedlack said he feels this year’s team has followed a similar trajectory in its long-awaited return to national prominence. “We were awful three years ago, so to suddenly have such a great team is exciting,” he said. “I’m really thrilled, most thrilled for the team.” Sedlack said he still takes pride in his former duty as an RA, bringing his wife and children to take pictures on Mod Quad, telling students about his experiences and sharing photos and emails with classmates. “I feel proud to be associated with [lighting the sign],” Sedlack said. “Grace was a fantastic dorm with a good crew of RAs, and we got along well with our rector. Not unlike this year, it was a magical season.” Marsh said the 8-foot-tall sign atop Grace now remains lit so long as any Irish sports team is ranked No. 1 in the nation. Prior to its lighting Sunday, the sign was most recently lit for the University’s fencing, women’s basketball and women’s soccer teams. The last time it was lit in honor of the football team was in 1993, when the Irish topped the Associated Press poll. Contact Kristen Durbin at kdurbin@nd.edulast_img read more

Read More →

Professor analyzes history of Christmas star

first_imgAlthough most people associate Christmas with a manger, shepherds and over-booked inns, astrophysicist Grant J. Matthews from Notre Dame’s department of physics enjoys examining the Nativity story from a cosmic perspective. Matthews gave a lecture titled “What and When Was the Christmas Star?” this past weekend.  “There’s actually a wealth of astronomy about the circumstances of how we celebrate Christmas,” Matthews said. The lecture utilized Jordan Hall’s state of the art Digital Visualization Theater to explore potential explanations of the Christmas star, which is described in the Gospel of Matthew. “Within our 10 computers here, we have programmed in memory every star, every object in the sky known to humankind. We can calculate their trajectory and where they’ve been, so we can go forward and back in time,” Matthews said. “Using this, we can go back to the time when that Christmas star first appeared and see how the sky might have appeared to the Magi and might have signaled that there was a newborn ruler in Judea.” Matthews said the Magi were early astrologers who searched for meaning in the carefully followed movements of celestial objects. “[The Magi] believed that each sign of the zodiac referred to a different time of the year and a different geographic location of the world,” he said. The night sky the Magi studied 2,000 years ago is distinctly different from the one we know today, Matthews said. “The location of the vernal equinox changes with time,” he said. “The vernal equinox was just departing the constellation of Aries, which actually fixed a lot of the lore of the time.” Aries, the first sign of the zodiac, is symbolized by a lamb and was considered by the Magi to signify Judea. “Something that would have been seen as important at the time would be represented by something occurring in the constellation Aries,” he said. Though scientists are unsure about what exactly this phenomenon was, Matthews said the four most likely theories suggest it was a comet, nova, supernova, or conjunction of planets. Using records of the Chinese Court, researchers discovered a few comets and supernovae that occurred near the time of Jesus’s birth, Mathews said.  However, Matthews does not think that the Magi would interpret these occurrences as joyous indications of a great leader being born.   “[Comets, novae, and supernovae] were seen as harbingers of a great disaster.  For example, each comet is associated with some catastrophic event: the death of Cleopatra, the death of Caesar, these were not harbingers of joy, they were warnings of disaster” Matthews said. Rather, Matthews said he believes the most likely explanation for what the Magi saw in the sky lies within our own solar system. “[The Magi] would be very concerned with the location of the planets. What they would look for would be where planets line up. Around 6 BC, the sun, Jupiter, and the moon are all in Aries and Venus and Saturn are right next door,” he said. This grouping of planets would have been interpreted eagerly by the Magi. Matthews said different objects in the solar system were thought to represent different symbolic meanings. “Jupiter is the symbol of a powerful leader. The moon means that the leader had a special appointed destiny in their death. Saturn indicated a giving of life. A powerful leader, a newborn king, born in the land of Judea in our time frame of interest.” Matthews said he believes this grouping closely matches the one reported in the original nativity story, sayingd the “Christmas star” most likely refers to this unusual grouping of celestial bodies.   Contact Grace McCormack at gmccorma@nd.edu.last_img read more

Read More →

Chorale to perform Handel’s ‘Messiah’

first_img“Messiah” is an oratorio that contains three movements, Bishop said. The Chorale will be singing most of the first two movements, for a performance that will be around two and a half hours. “It depends on how many solos we do,” she said. “We don’t do the entire piece, we kind of pick and choose.” This year’s performance is unique in that the Chorale will be accompanied by a Baroque orchestra, Bishop said. The orchestra is comprised of Notre Dame students and other musicians. “A lot of the people play with us for ‘Messiah‘ every year,” she said. “The string instruments have a different feel. We still sing with a harpsichord, but it’s really cool because it’s more historically accurate.”Director Alexander Blachly said in an email the Baroque instruments have a several advantages as accompaniment for works like “Messiah.”“Most notably, they make the phrases easier to play and easier to shape. Modern strings don’t let in enough lightness and air, and as a result the phrases tend to sound heavy and labored, even when played softly,” he said. “Certain effects, like sudden strong notes, also project better with Baroque instruments. The older instruments are not as loud as modern ones, and this has one advantage and one disadvantage: the advantage is that the sound is gentler, more voice-like.”The downside is that the Baroque instruments do not project as easily in a large hall, Blachly said, “and the players therefore have to take that into account and play with a little more projection than would be necessary on modern instruments.”“Perhaps the greatest advantage is that the Baroque instruments are pitched a half-step lower than modern instruments, with the result that the highest notes for the sopranos are easier to sing,” he said.‘Messiah’ is intended to retell the history of early Christianity, Blachly said, from the prophecies of Jesus’ birth, through the host of angels singing of his glory to the shepherds, then his Passion and suffering, and finally, the arrival of Christianity, with the anticipation of the Day of Judgment.“The Chorale sings virtually all of part one, the prophecies and birth, most of part two, Jesus’ Passion, and several numbers from part three, which looks forward to a future day in heaven when the souls will be united with Christ,” he said.  “The Chorale ends its performance with the final number of part two, the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus, which, with its trumpets, foretells the Day of Judgment.”Bishop said the piece is performed a lot at Easter time, as well, because parts of the second and third movements deal with the death of Jesus.“One of my favorite songs is a passage from the Bible that is commonly read at Christmas time, where angel comes down from heaven and there’s the shepherds watching over the flock and she announces the birth of Jesus,” Bishop said. “So there are a lot of those classic Christmas messages in it.”The Chorale has been rehearsing for the performances since November, she said. “Because we sing it every year, we normally learn it pretty fast,” she said. “The old members help carry the new members. … and it generally requires some outside time, especially for the new people.”Bishop said Chorale has a large number of new members this year. “It was really exciting to see them on Monday for the first time, get to hear us perform our choruses with the orchestra, and seeing it all start to come together,” she said. “This is my favorite thing we perform. I love it, I smile through the whole thing. I’m not normally a huge classical music person, but Handel’s ‘Messiah’ is something else.”Bishop said it has been “extra special” to sing ‘Messiah’ for the last time, especially as president of a group she loves.“I’ll probably tear up during my last ‘Hallelujah’ chorus,” Bishop said. “It’s a special group, full of my best friends. … We’re a really different group of people that are all brought together by our love of music, and I think that brings a lot of unique aspects to our group. … It’s one of those places where I always feel so comfortable, and welcomed and loved.”In addition to performing Handel’s “Messiah,” the official concert choir of the University has fall and spring concerts, Bishop said. On the last week of winter break, Chorale will tour the Midwest. “We’ll sing the ‘Hallelujah’ chorus at all our stops. I wish we got to sing more, but it’s not quite the same with just the piano. It’s when you add in the orchestra is when it really becomes something else.”Tags: chorale, DPAC, Messiah Courtesy of Mimi Michuda The Notre Dame Chorale performs Handel’s “Messiah” last year at the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. The Notre Dame Chorale’s annual performance of Handel’s “Messiah” will take place at Leighton Hall in the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center on Friday and Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Tickets are $3 for students, $2 if they are bought from Chorale members.“One of the reasons I decided to try out for Chorale is because I saw we were singing Handel’s ‘Messiah.’ And I just love the ‘Hallelujah Chorus,’ and I’ve really fallen in love with all of ‘Messiah,’” senior and chorale president Erin Bishop said.last_img read more

Read More →

VP Of Skilled Nursing At Heritage Appointed To Nursing Facility Cabinet

first_imgImage by Heritage Ministries.GERRY – Heritage Ministries’ Vice President of Skilled Nursing Operations was recently appointed to a regional nursing facility cabinet that advocates for older adults.As a member of the LeadingAge Illinois Nursing Facility Cabinet, Jeremy Rutter will be responsible for helping identify needs of members that he represents and determining how the group can help meet the needs.The cabinet also acts as the governance body that works on the public policy agenda for the member type they represent. Tasks can include determining if a piece of legislation should be supported or opposed by LeadingAge Illinois, determining if LeadingAge Illinois should propose a piece of legislation and helping to write it, and examining regulations and proposing changes.“I am very happy to be able to represent the skilled nursing facility community and serve on this cabinet,” said Rutter. “As the Vice President of Skilled Nursing Operations for Heritage Ministries, my mission is to ensure our elderly are cared for in environments that promote Hope, Dignity, and Purposeful Living. It is not enough that I do that for my own community, and through legislative and advocacy work with LeadingAge, I hope to extend that to all elderly living in skilled nursing facilities.” Committed to advancing excellence, LeadingAge Illinois advocates quality services, promotes innovative practices and fosters collaboration.LeadingAge Illinois serves the full spectrum of providers including home and community based services, senior housing, continuing care retirement communities, assisted living, supportive living, and skilled nursing/rehabilitation centers. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

Chautauqua County Officials Correct COVID-19 Case Statistics

first_imgTwo students of Jamestown Public Schools have tested positive for COVID-19 who have been attending by distance learning only. These students were already being monitored by public health staff. There are currently 50 active active cases with three of those cases employees of Fieldbrook Foods. There also is one community contact associated with this employee.There are now 10 active actives regarding SUNY Fredonia students with 80 recoveries. 313 cases remain under quarantine or isolation orders by the Public Health Director and 30 are under domestic traveler quarantine for having arrived to Chautauqua County from a state listed on the New York State travel advisory.There also remains four hospitalizations.To date, there have been 592 positive cases, 521 recoveries, 10 COVID-19 related deaths, and 39,534 negative test results. WNY News Now / MGN Stock Image.MAYVILLE – Chautauqua County Health officials are correcting COVID-19 data released this week.In an update on Wednesday officials corrected the number of reported cases Tuesday from eight to six.On Wednesday, the Chautauqua County Health Department also reported six new positive cases breaking down as follows:One case in MayvilleFive cases in Fredoniacenter_img Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Read More →

Rufus Sewell & Oliver Chris Will Get Closer in London

first_img Sewell garnered a Tony nomination for Rock ‘n’ Roll and has also appeared on Broadway in Translations. His film and TV credits include Dark City, The Illusionist, A Knight’s Tale, The Holiday, Parade’s End, Eleventh Hour and The Last King. Chris appeared on the Great White Way in One Man, Two Guvnors. He is currently starring in the National Theatre’s much buzzed-about Great Britain and is set to appear in the upcoming Kings Charles III in the West End. Carroll won the Olivier for After the Dance, which also starred Benedict Cumberbatch. Her other stage credits include The Duck House, The Magistrate, Twelfth Night, House of Games and Arcadia. Closer received its world premiere at the U.K.’s National Theatre in 1997 and ran on Broadway in 1999, receiving a Tony nod for Best Play. The film adaptation was released in 2004 starring Julia Roberts, Jude Law, Natalie Portman and Clive Owen. Broadway alums Rufus Sewell and Oliver Chris, along with Oliver winner Nancy Carroll, will star in Closer at London’s Donmar Warehouse. According to the Daily Mail, Patrick Marber’s play will begin a three-month engagement in February 2015. David Leveaux will direct. Closer examines betrayal and modern love. Set in London, it follows four people whose lives interconnect over four and a half years. Sewell will play Larry, a doctor who visits sex chat rooms; Chris will appear as Dan, an obituary writer, and Carroll will play Anna, a photographer who has love affairs with both men. View Commentslast_img read more

Read More →